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dc.contributor.authorShanks, Alan L.
dc.contributor.authorMacMahan, Jamie
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Steven G.
dc.contributor.authorM Reniers, Ad J.H.
dc.contributor.authorJarvis, Marley
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Jenna
dc.contributor.authorFujimura, Atsushi
dc.contributor.authorGriesemer, Chris
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-19T14:50:37Z
dc.date.available2017-05-19T14:50:37Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationA.L. Shanks, J. MacMahan, S.G. Morgan, A.J.H.M Reniers, M. Jaris, J. Brown, A. Fujimura, C. Griesdemer, "Transport of larvae and detritus across the surf zone of a steep reflective pocket beach," Marine Ecology Progress Series, v.528, (2015), pp. 71-86en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/53389
dc.descriptionThe article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.3354/meps11223en_US
dc.description.abstractLarvae of many intertidal species develop offshore and must cross the surf zone to complete their onshore migration to adult habitats. Depending on hydrodynamics, the surf zone may limit this migration, especially on reflective rocky shores. As a logistically tractable analog of a rocky shore environment, we carried out a comprehensive biological and physical study of the hydrodynamics of a steep reflective sandy beach. Holoplankton and precompetent larval invertebrates were much less abundant within the surf zone than offshore, and their concentrations inside and outside the surf zone were not significantly correlated, suggesting that they were not entering the surf zone. Persistent offshore flow throughout the water column at the outer edge of the surf zone may prevent these organisms from entering the surf zone. In contrast, the concentrations of detritus and a competent larval invertebrate (i.e. cyprids), while also not significantly correlated with concentrations offshore, were frequently more concentrated in the surf zone than offshore. Within the surf zone, the concentration of detritus was significantly correlated with concentrations of competent larval invertebrates (barnacles, gastropods, polychaetes, and bopyrid amphipod) and organisms that may be associated with detritus (amphipods and harpacticoid copepods). These concentrations were significantly negatively correlated with average daily wave height. We hypothesize that detritus and larvae enter the surf zone near the bottom during calm wave conditions by a process of near-bottom streaming. Near-bottom streaming is associated with all surf zones and may be a general mechanism for onshore transport of larvae close to the coast.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundationen_US
dc.format.extent16 p.en_US
dc.publisherInter-Researchen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleTransport of larvae and detritus across the surf zone of a steep reflective pocket beachen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentOceaongraphyen_US
dc.subject.authorStreamingen_US
dc.subject.authorCypridsen_US
dc.subject.authorCompetent larvaeen_US
dc.subject.authorPrecompetent larvaeen_US
dc.subject.authorDetritusen_US
dc.subject.authorReflective beachen_US
dc.subject.authorCross-shore exchangeen_US
dc.description.funderGrant NSD-OCE#092735en_US


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