Organization:
Aerodynamic Decelerator Systems Center (ADSC)

orgunit.page.dateEstablished
2001
orgunit.page.dateDissolved
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Description
Focuses on novel research topics that support technologies vital to the Army’s future force, combating terrorism and new emerging threats; Supports the development of a family of various-weight precision guided airdrop systems, which enable conventional military aircraft or autonomous vehicles to drop sensors, munitions, and/or supplies at high offsets onto the battlefield with near pinpoint accuracy, minimizing risk to the airdrop aircraft and limiting the need for ground vehicle convoys; Backs up the development and testing of a variety of fixed- and rotary-wing unmanned platforms carrying EO/IR sensors to be used in the different surveillance and reconnaissance missions; Pursues the development and implementation of interactive / automated tools / GUIs to support a variety of YPG missions, including those devoted to real-time image processing; Accelerates research results transition to real-world fielded applications; Provides YPG personnel with high-quality training in a variety of applied disciplines (computer-aided engineering; inertial navigation, navaids, GPS; communication and networking; computer vision and EO/IR imagery data processing; autonomous systems, weaponry.
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Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 51
  • Publication
    Coordinated Payload Delivery using High Glide Parafoil Systems
    (Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School, 2005) Kaminer, I.; Yakimenko, O.; Aerodynamic Decelerator Systems Center (ADSC)
    The paper proposes a solution to the problem of coordinated drop of multiple parafoils to ensure collision-free maneuvers under strict spatial constraints. The solution proposed relies on the decoupling of space and time in the problem formulation. First, a set of feasible trajectories are generated for all parafoils using a new direct method of optimal control that takes into account rules for collision avoidance. A byproduct of this step yields for each system a spatial path to be followed. Each parafoil is then asked to execute a pure path following maneuver in three-dimensional space by resorting to a novel 3-D algorithm that enforces separation constraints. Simulations illustrate the potential of the methodology developed.
  • Publication
    AGAS: Development of Affordable Guided Airdrop System Landing (12.3 Mb, 22 sec.) [video]
    (Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School, 2008-05-01) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.); Aerodynamic Decelerator Systems Center; Aerodynamic Decelerator Systems Center (ADSC)
  • Publication
    Miniature Autonomous Rocket Recovery System (MARRS)
    (Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School, 2011-05) Yingling, Adam J.; Hewgley, Charles W.; Seigenthaler, Thomas A.; Yakimenko, Oleg A.; Aerodynamic Decelerator Systems Center (ADSC); Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE); Electrical Engineering; Systems Engineering
    This paper discusses the development and testing of the new-generation recovery system in highpowered rockets. It starts from the overall description of the rocket system, the requirements of the Miniature Autonomous Rocket Recovery System (MARRS) and is followed by a description of a flight tested MARRS. Next, simulation and results from the flight tests are given. This paper ends with conclusions and recommendations for follow-on testing.
  • Publication
    Modeling and Simulation of a Ship Launched Glider Cargo Delivery System
    (Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School, 2006) Puranik, A.; Parker, G.; Passerello, C.; Bird, D.; Yakimenko, O.; Kaminer, I.; Aerodynamic Decelerator Systems Center (ADSC)
    The paper deals with the high-fidelity modeling and simulation of a powered parafoil-payload system with respect to its application in autonomous precision airborne cargo delivery. In the proposed concept the cargo transfer is accomplished in two phases: Initial towing phase when the glider follows the towing vessel in a passive lift mode and the autonomous gliding phase when the system is guided to the desired point. During the towing phase, the system gains as much altitude as possible by taking the angle-of-attack that will provide the best lift. Once sufficient altitude is attained, the gliding phase starts. The system is steered to the desired location by controlling the lengths of the rear suspension lines using two control inputs. The paper presents the concept of the system, its 6DoF model, the control algorithm at the stage of passive glide and the simulation results.
  • Publication
    Autonomous Video Scoring and Dynamic Attitude Measurement
    (Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School, 2005) Yakimenko, O.; Dobrokhodov, V.; Kaminer, I.; Aerodynamic Decelerator Systems Center (ADSC)
    The paper focuses on the development and evaluation of an autonomous payload tracking capability for determining time, state and attitude information (TSPI) of all types of airdrop loads. This automated capability of accurately acquiring TSPI data, will reduce the labor time and eliminate man-in-the-loop errors. The paper analyses the problem and then proceeds with the description of the PerceptiVU Target Tracking System (TTS) software adopted for obtaining the TSPI. The key features of this software include a choice of three basic tracking algorithms (dynamic centroid, hottest spot thresholding, dynamic correlation), capability of capturing from both standard analog video sources (such as NTSC and/or RS170) and digital video sources, control of the entire system with an off-the-shelf joystick controller. The paper further describes algorithms to be used in conjunction with the data provided by the TTS to determine systemメs state variables. A position estimation solution is based on tracking a payloadメs center (or any other predetermined point) by several cameras with known positions. A pose (position and orientation) estimation solution is based on tracking of four distinctive non-coplanar points. Pre-selected and artificially marked points on the moving target cooperatively serve as beacons, therefore providing precise measurements of the line of sign toward these points. This allows unique position and attitude estimation and no need for additional pattern recognition. In conclusion, the paper provides examples of video data processing and parameters estimation.
  • Publication
    Development of a Payload Derived Position Acquisition System for Parachute Recovery Systems
    (Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School, 2008) Tiaden, R.D.; Yakimenko, O.A.; Aerodynamic Decelerator Systems Center (ADSC)
  • Publication
    On the Development of a Scalable 8-DoF Model of a Generic Parafoil-Based Delivery System
    (Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School, 2005) Yakimenko, Oleg; Aerodynamic Decelerator Systems Center (ADSC)
    The paper presents an initial move to develop a scalable high-degree-of-freedom model of the parafoilpayload system. The intention is to develop the tool capable of: i) determining basic systemメs geometry parameters by observing the video data of the real descend, ii) readjusting the nominal aerodynamic and control coefficients incorporated into the well-established equations of motions, and iii) performing model identification to tune numerous relative variables to achieve the best fit with the real drop data if available. Since in the certain way such a tool would represent some kind of generalization of the modeling efforts undertaken so far, the present paper starts from a comprehensive review of publications devoted to the modeling of parafoil-payload systems. The paper then briefly addressed the current stage of the development of a scalable model. In anticipation of real drop data to validate the approach paper ends with conclusions.
  • Publication
    Aerodynamic Decelerator Systems Center (archived)
    (Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School, 2001) Aerodynamic Decelerator Systems Center (ADSC); Aeronautics and Astronautics
    The Aerodynamic Decelerator Systems Center (ADSC) was founded in 2001 and currently pursues the following objectives: Continue supporting the Affordable Guided Airdrop System precision airdrop capability; a circular-parachute guided cargo system; Support the development of a family of various weight precision guided airdrop systems, which enable conventional military aircraft to drop sensors, munitions, and/or supplies at high-offsets onto the battlefield with near pinpoint accuracy, minimizing risk to the airdrop aircraft and limiting the need for ground vehicle convoys; Pursue the development and implementation of an autonomous payload tracking capability for determining time, 3D position, and attitude to support the modeling and system identification for all types of airdrop loads.
  • Publication
    AGAS: Development of Affordable Guided Airdrop System Release and deployment (10.8 Mb, 34 sec.) [video]
    (Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School, 2008-05-01) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.); Aerodynamic Decelerator Systems Center; Aerodynamic Decelerator Systems Center (ADSC)
  • Publication
    Video Scoring: Video Data Reduction and Air Delivery Payload Pose Estimation, KTM 1-60 (44.0 Mb, 2 min 55 sec) [video]
    (Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School, 2007-07-18) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.); Aerodynamic Decelerator Systems Center; Aerodynamic Decelerator Systems Center (ADSC)