Organization:
Computer Science (CS)

orgunit.page.dateEstablished
orgunit.page.dateDissolved
City
Country
Description
The mission of the Computer Science department is to provide defense-relevant, advanced education and research programs to meet Naval unique needs, and increase the warfighting effectiveness of the U.S. Naval Forces, DoD and allied armed forces.
Type
Website of the organization
ID

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 243
  • Publication
    Experience with [omega]: Implementation of a prototype programming environment, Part V
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, 1985-05) MacLennan, Bruce J.; Computer Science (CS); Graduate School of Operational and Information Sciences (GSOIS); Computer Science
    This is the fifth report of a series exploring the use of the £7 programming notation to prototype a programming environment. This environment includes an interpreter, unparser, syntax directed editor, command interpreter, debugger and code generator, and supports programming in a small applicative language. The present report presents a code generator operating on abstract syntax trees. The code generation process is implemented as an evaluator over a nonstandard domain. An implementation of the code generator is listed in the appendices.
  • Publication
    An empirical comparison of software fault tolerance and fault elimination
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, 1989-07) Shimeall, Tomothy J.; Leveson, Nancy; Computer Science (CS); Graduate School of Operational and Information Sciences (GSOIS); Computer Science
    Reliability is an important concern in the development of software for modern systems. Some researchers have hypothesized that particular fault-handling approaches or techniques are so effective that other approaches or techniques are superfluous. The authors have performed a study that compares two major approaches to the improvement of software, software fault elimination and software fault tolerance, by examination of the fault detection obtained by five techniques: run-time assertions, multi-version voting, functional testing augmented by structural testing, code reading by stepwise abstraction, and static data-flow analysis. This study has focused on characterizing the sets of faults detected by the techniques and on characterizing the relationships between these sets of faults. The results of the study show that none of the techniques studied is necessarily redundant to any combination of the others. Further results reveal strengths and weakness in the fault detection by the techniques studied and suggest directions for future research
  • Publication
    Rule-Based Motion Coordination For the Adaptive Suspension Vehicle on Ternary-Type Terrain
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, 1990-12) McGhee, Robert B.; Kwak, Se-Hung; Computer Science (CS); Graduate School of Operational and Information Sciences (GSOIS); Computer Science
    This study investigates the utility of rule based coordination of motion for ternary-type terrain locomotion by a hexapod walking machine. The ternary-type terrain considered is composed of permitted areas, forbidden areas, and ditch areas. The logic for generating motion coordination is written in Prolog while the simulation of the terrain and of the vehicle kinematics, as well as low-level on-board computer functions, are written in extended Common Lisp and Flavors. It is found that this approach, which utilizes multiple programming paradigms for programming motion coordination logic and simulation objects, results in code that is much easier to understand and modify than previous motion coordination programs written in Pascal. Thus, the code development effort and time are greatly reduced. The authors believe that both the methodology and the motion coordination logic presented in this report possess sufficient merit to justify full-scale physical testing in the Adaptive Suspension Vehicle at the Ohio State University
  • Publication
    Uniform representation of data types in Polymorphic C
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, 1995-10) Pederson, Carl M.; Computer Science (CS); Graduate School of Operational and Information Sciences (GSOIS); Research and Sponsored Programs Office (RSPO); Computer Science
  • Publication
    Predictive push logistic using runtime monitoring of hidden and visible data
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, 2018-02) Drusinsky, Doron; Computer Science (CS); Graduate School of Operational and Information Sciences (GSOIS); Computer Science (CS)
    This report described a general purpose predictive logistics software package based on three primary components: 1. A spreadsheet of ship related orders. 2. A Probabilistic Temporal Finite State-Machine (PTFSM) automatically learned from that data. 3. (Optional) Expert rules written in English. The deliverable tool predicts orders per Ship-ItemType pairs. It has two main prediction modes: a. Predict a probability of an order (for one or more Ship-ItemType pairs) to be required in n weeks. b. Predict the number of weeks required for the probability of an order (for one or more Ship-ItemType pairs) to exceed some given value p.
  • Publication
    A library of failure regions
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, 1991-09) Shimeall, Timothy J.; Computer Science (CS); Graduate School of Operational and Information Sciences (GSOIS); Computer Science
    A failure region is the set of all possible program inputs that will execute a specific fault and produce a result that varies from the specified or expected program result. The purpose of this report is to document a set of failure regions corresponding to the known faults in a set of redundant program versions. Each failure region is characterized in two ways: by identifying the fault that it reveals and by identifying the boolean conditions necessary and sufficient to consider a program input to be a member of the failure region. Other reports describe the region analysis technique and profile the regions detailed here
  • Publication
    A Survey of XOR as a Digital Obfuscation Technique in a Corpus of Real Data
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, 2014-01-17) Zarate, Carolina; Garfinkel, Simson L.; Heffernan, Aubin; Gorak, Kyle; Horras, Scott; Computer Science (CS); Graduate School of Operational and Information Sciences (GSOIS); Computer Science
    To determine the usage of XOR and the need to adapt additional tools, we analyzed 2,411 drive images from devices acquired around the world for the use of bytewise XOR as an obfuscation technique. Using a modified version of the open source digital forensics tool bulk˙extractor, evidence of XOR obfuscation was found on 698 drive images, with a maximum of 21,031 XOR-obfuscated features on a single drive. XOR usage in our corpus was observed in files with timestamps between the years 1995 and 2009, but the majority use was found in unallocated space. On the corpus tested, XOR obfuscation was used to circumvent malware detection and reverse engineering, to hide information that was apparently being exfiltrated, and by malware detection tools for their quarantine directory and to distribute malware signatures. We conclude that XOR obfuscation is important to consider when performing malware investigations.
  • Publication
    1996 Faculty Research Catalog
    (Monterey, California; Naval Postgraduate School, 1996-03) Rowe, Neil; Computer Science (CS); Graduate School of Operational and Information Sciences (GSOIS); Computer Science
  • Publication
    Clustering, concurrency control, crash recovery, garbage collection, and security in object-oriented database management systems
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, 1991-02) de Paula, Everton, G.; Nelson, Michael L.; Computer Science (CS); Graduate School of Operational and Information Sciences (GSOIS); Research and Sponsored Programs Office (RSPO); Computer Science
    This paper presents considerations about several topics that have a direct influence on data reliability and performance in object oriented database management systems. These topics are: physical storage management (clustering), concurrency control, crash recovery, garbage collection, and database security. Each topic is illustrated by its application to the Tactical Database as designed for the Low Cost Combat Direction System
  • Publication
    Blockchain Mergence and Reconditioning Blockchain to Enable Global Supply Chain Assurance
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, 2020-11) Hale, Britta; Brutzman, Don; Culbert, Jonathan; Norbraten, Terry; Computer Science (CS); Graduate School of Operational and Information Sciences (GSOIS); Research and Sponsored Programs Office (RSPO); Computer Science (CS)
    Distributed ledger technology such as blockchain could ideally be used to solve challenges in global supply chain assurance. In blockchain, consensus is achieved among active concurrent participants. The chain is, by design, required to be a single forward-building path of events; if branches appear, the chain consensus ensures that all but one branch is discarded. A supply chain in comparison, particularly on the production side, is a reversed architecture. In this case, small parts are used to build larger parts, hence requiring blockchain mergence (e.g., a final ready-for-use vehicle is comprised of multiple smaller parts sourced from various vendors, manufacturers, and even countries). Thus, the current capabilities of blockchain do not meet the fundamental demands of supply chains. Assuring supply chain integrity and visibility requires an adaptation of the technology to allow a form of blockchain mergence that the original concept was not designed to handle. This research looks at a possible solution among hash chains, blockchain, and ledger options for supply chain strategy.