Organization:
Systems Management (SM)

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Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 33
  • Publication
    MCTSSA Software Reliability Handbook, Volume III: Integration of Software Metrics with Quality and Reliability
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, 1997-06-18) Schneidewind, Norman F.; Systems Management (SM); Systems Management
    The purpose of this handbook is threefold. Specifically, it: (1) Serves as a reference guide for implementing standard software reliability practices at Marine Corps Tactical Systems Support Activity and aids in applying the software reliability model. (2) Serves as a tool for managing the software reliability program. (3) Serves as a training aid.
  • Publication
    Understanding videoteleducation an overview
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, 1995-01) Suchan, James E.; Crawford, Alice M.; Systems Management (SM); Systems Management
  • Publication
    MCTSSA Software Reliability Handbook, Volume II: Data Collection Demonstration and Software Reliability Modeling for a Multi-Function Distributed System
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, 1997-08-15) Schneidewind, Norman F.; Systems Management (SM); Research and Sponsored Programs Office (RSPO); Systems Management
    The purpose of this handbook is threefold. Specifically, it: Serves as a reference guide for implementing standard software reliability practices at Marine Corps Tactical Systems Support Activity and aids in applying the software reliability model; Serves as a tool for managing the software reliability program; and Serves as a training aid.
  • Publication
    Media selection in graduate education for Navy Medical Officers.
    (1996-12) Crawford, Alice M.; Suchan, Jim; Systems Management (SM)
  • Publication
    MCTSSA software reliability handbook. Volume I, Software reliability engineering process and modeling for a single process
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, Systems Management, 1996-01-10) Schneidewind, Norman F.; Heineman, Julie.; Systems Management (SM); Systems Management
  • Publication
    Error Patterns from Alternative Cost Progress Models
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, 1993-11) Moses, O. Douglas; Systems Management (SM); Systems Management
    Numerous cost progress models have been offered in the literature and used in practice. This paper selects five cost progress models which predict future cost using various combinations of three factors (past cost, cumulative quantity, and production rate), and investigates the forecast accuracy of the models under varying circumstances. The broad objectives are to (1) identity conditions which may affect model accuracy, documenting the manner in which forecast errors for each model depend on those conditions, and (2) suggest which of the five models may be more or less accurate under a given set of conditions. Particular attention is paid to how model accuracy is affected by one specific condition - changes in production rate.
  • Publication
    Data and models to build supply blocks for deploying Marine Corps units
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, Department of Systems Management, 1999-12) Gue, Kevin R.; Systems Management (SM); Systems Management.
  • Publication
    Profile of Unsatisfactory Participant Losses from the USAR
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, 1999-03) Kocher, Kathryn M.; Thomas, George W.; Systems Management (SM); Systems Management
    This report profiles enlisted personnel leaving USAR drilling TPU status voluntarily, particularly unsatisfactory participants, based on prior service status: nonprior service (no prior Active Duty or Reserve service); prior Active Duty service (18 or more consecutive months); and "other" prior service (less than 18 months Active Duty service or prior Reserve service). Leavers from the 1995-96 transaction files are compared with the 1994 USAR membership. Loss categories include: no shows, unsatisfactory participants, voluntary separations, transfers from the USAR, and ETS. Unsatisfactory participants are the most common loss among nonprior and "other" prior service losses while voluntary separations are most common among prior Active service losses. Nonprior service unsatisfactory participants and no shows are more likely than other losses and the USAR membership to be unmarried, male, members of a minority race/ethnic group, and to be younger, less educated and lower ranking. Prior Active service unsatisfactory participants and no shows are more likely to be male, married, more educated, higher ranking, and less likely to be DMOS qualified or working in their own PMOS or SMOS than their nonprior service counterparts. "Other" prior service unsatisfactory participants and no shows fall between these two prior service groups on most measures.
  • Publication
    MCTSSA Software Reliability Handbook, Volume IV: Schneidewind Software Reliability and Metrics Model Tool List
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, 1997-05-12) Schneidewind, Norman F.; Systems Management (SM); Systems Management
    The purpose of this handbook is threefold. Specifically, it: 1. Serves as a reference guide for implementing standard software reliability practices at Marine Corps Tactical Systems Support Activity and aids in applying the software reliability model. 2. Serves as a tool for managing the software reliability program. 3. Serves as a training aid.
  • Publication
    Leadership and retention in TPU's: a framework
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, 1995-08) Thomas, Kenneth Wayne; Systems Management (SM); Systems Management
    Retention is a key readiness factor in US Army Reserve units. The initial report develops an integrative, conceptual model of retention in Troop Program Units (TPU's) that highlights the role of TPU leadership. It describes three qualitatively different decision processes involved in soldiers' decision to remain in TPU's-economic, psychological, and sociological. Based on a review of prior research on attrition/retention in the US Army Reserve, it identifies five sets of favorable unit conditions that influence unit retention via those decision processes-timely pay/benefits administration, satisfying training, unit cohesion, trust in leaders, and support from employer and spouse. It proposes that the creation of these favorable conditions be considered key leadership goals for TPU commanders, and outlines the next stage of the research program, which will identify specific leader behaviors that build these favorable conditions.