Organization:
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE)

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The mission of the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering department is to provide defense-relevant, advanced education and research programs to meet Naval unique needs, and increase the warfighting effectiveness of the U.S. Naval Forces, DoD and allied armed forces.
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Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 109
  • Publication
    Camp Roberts: Tactical Network Topology (TNT) / Mission-­‐Based Experiments (MBE) / Concept-­‐Based Experiments (CBE) QuickLook Report
    (Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School., 2009-04-23) Wells, Linton II; Crowley, John; Thørud, Harald; Institute for Joint Warfare Analysis (IJWA); Sharing To Accelerate Research - Transformative Innovation for Development and Emergency Support (STAR-TIDES); Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE); Graduate School of Engineering and Applied Science (GSEAS); Research & Experimentation for Local & International Emergency First-Responders (RELIEF); Naval Postgraduate School
    The TIDES1 project is an international, knowledge-sharing research effort to encourage sustainable, affordable support to stressed populations in post-disaster, post-­war, or impoverished environments. These environments include missions such as Stabilization and Reconstruction (SSTR), Humanitarian Assistance-Disaster Relief (HADR), and Building the Capacity of Partner Nations (BPC). By and large, TIDES is used to refer to specific projects which can draw on the world-wide assets of the STAR-­‐TIDES network. TIDES is a part of a broader effort called STAR (Sustainable Technologies, Accelerated Research).
  • Publication
    Low-Earth-Orbit Maintenance: Reboost vs Thrust-Drag Cancellation
    (1995-07) Ross, I. Michael; Alfriend, Kyle T.; Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation Institute (MOVES); Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE); Graduate School of Engineering and Applied Science (GSEAS); Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics
    We define the problem of orbit maintenance within an atmosphere as keeping the spacecraft within a specified altitude band about a mean circular orbit.
  • Publication
    Gravitational Effects of Earth in Optimizing Delta V for Deflecting Earth-Crossing Asteroids
    (2001-10) Ross, I. Michael; Park, Sang-Young; Porter, Scott D. V.; Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation Institute (MOVES); Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE); Graduate School of Engineering and Applied Science (GSEAS); Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics
    Analyses incorporating the gravitational effects of Earth to calculate optimal impulses for de ecting Earthcrossing asteroids are presented. The patched conic method is used to formulate the constrained optimization problem. Geocentric constraints are mapped to heliocentric variables by the use of the impact parameter. The result is a uni ed nonlinear programming problem in the sense that no distinctions are made for short or long warning times. Numerical solutions indicate that the delta V requirements are considerably more than those of the previously published two-body analysis that excluded third-body effects. Generally speaking, the increments in the minimum delta V due to the gravitational effects of the Earth are large (by asmuch as 60%) for near-Earth asteroids, and the errors diminish for orbits with large eccentricities (e>0.7). Some interesting results for short warning times are also discussed.
  • Publication
    RELIEF 12-1: Information Packet
    (Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School., 2011-11) Institute for Joint Warfare Analysis (IJWA); Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE); Graduate School of Engineering and Applied Science (GSEAS); Research & Experimentation for Local & International Emergency First-Responders (RELIEF); Naval Postgraduate School
    RELIEF 12-1: Information Packet including schedule of events, experiments, speakers, driving directions.
  • Publication
    A HEL testbed for high accuracy beam pointing and control
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, 2009) Kim, Dojong; Frist, Duane; Kim, Jae Jun; Agrawal, Brij; Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE); Graduate School of Engineering and Applied Science (GSEAS)
    High energy laser (HEL) weapons are some of most challenging military applications in the future battle fields since the speed of light delivery enables the war fighter to engage very distant targets immediately. The issues of the technology on the HEL system include various types of high energy laser devices, beam control systems, atmospheric propagation, and target lethality. Among them, precision pointing of laser beam and high-bandwidth rejection of jitters produced by platform vibrations are one of the key technologies for the emerging fields of laser communications and HEL systems. HEL testbed has been developed to support the research environments on the precision beam control technology including acquisition, tracking, and pointing. The testbed incorporates optical table, two axis gimbal, high speed computers, and a variety of servo components, sensors, optical components, and software. In this report, system configuration and operation modes of the testbed are briefly introduced. The results of the experiments and integrated modeling from component to system level are described and discussed. Based on these results, new control algorithms are designed and it is shown that the algorithm can improve the pointing performance of the system.
  • Publication
    Formal Analysis of Elastically Supported Beam Columns
    (1966) Brock, John E.; Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation Institute (MOVES); Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE); Graduate School of Engineering and Applied Science (GSEAS)
    A method is presented for the systematic analysis of elastically supported beam-columns or tie-bars in which formal notational devices simplify the handling of complicated discontinuous lateral loads. Various relationships between axial load and support modulus are treated and three particular cases (fixedfixed, pinned-pinned, and free-free ends) are exhibited.
  • Publication
    RELIEF Newsletter / August 2012 / Issue 5
    (Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School., 2012-08) Institute for Joint Warfare Analysis (IJWA); Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE); Graduate School of Engineering and Applied Science (GSEAS); Research & Experimentation for Local & International Emergency First-Responders (RELIEF); Naval Postgraduate School
  • Publication
    Identification of stiffness properties of orthotropic lamina using the experimental natural frequencies and mode shapes
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, 2007-11) Gordis, Joshua H.; Ryou, Jung-Kyu; Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE); Graduate School of Engineering and Applied Science (GSEAS)
    Mechanical properties of advanced composite lamina are identified for better mathematical modeling of composite laminate for structural analysis. Each lamina is treated as an orthotropic material under plane stress state and are assumed to be transversely isotropic. Four stiffness properties, (E1, E2, n12, G12), are treated as design variables for minimization of a performance index. The differences between analytically obtained and experimental natural frequencies for the specimen, along with a proper weighting scheme for each mode, are minimized using the optimization routine, 'fmincon' in the MATLAB¬ optimization toolbox. The modal assurance criterion is utilized to construct the weighting to express the degree of correlation between mode shape vectors obtained experimentally and derived analytically. This study requires a series of experimental results; natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes of the specimen. A computational tool has been developed as a result of this study. Numerical examples are investigated to demonstrate the performance of this approach. Further study with experiments may show practical benefit of current method for characterization of mechanical properties of advanced composite materials
  • Publication
    A pseudospectral feedback method for real-time optimal guidance of reentry vehicles
    (IEEE, 2007-07-11) Bollino, Kevin P.; Ross, I. Michael; Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation Institute (MOVES); Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE); Graduate School of Engineering and Applied Science (GSEAS); Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.); IEEE; Mechanical & Astronautical Engineering
    Motivated by the emerging needs of the next generation of reusable launch vehicles (RLV), a pseudospectral (PS) feedback method is designed and applied to guide an RLV across multiple phases of an entry trajectory. That is, by generating real-time, open-loop, optimal controls, it is shown that a single PS-feedback law successfully guides an X-33-type vehicle in the presence of large disturbances, g-load and heating-rate constraints. The notion of a Caratheodory-��___ solution is used to design, develop and implement the guidance algorithm.
  • Publication
    Optimal Trajectory of a Glider in Ground Effect and Wind Shear
    (The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), 2005-08-15) Harada, Masanori; Bollino, Kevin; Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation Institute (MOVES); Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE); Graduate School of Engineering and Applied Science (GSEAS); Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.); American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA)
    The optimal, maximum range trajectory for a glider in ground effect and wind shear has been analyzed using numerical methods and analytical techniques based on optimal control theory. This investigation models the glider's nonlinear dynamics and includes both ground effect and wind shear models. An optimal control problem is formulated to maximize downrange distance and it includes state-variable inequality constraints. The problem is then solved using an algorithm that implements a Legendre pseudospectral collocation method. The results show that the glider's optimal trajectory follows an energy-efficient trajectory, the altitude path with the lowest energy height consumption in ground effect and tail-wind shear. The numerical results are presented within.