Publication:
Using dynamic sustainment to determine the impact of varying levels of reliability on future combat systems maintenance requirements

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Authors
Dozier, Pamela C.
Subjects
Advisors
Buttrey, Samuel E.
Date of Issue
2006-12
Date
Publisher
Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
The primary purpose of this thesis is to provide analysis for future reliability studies. This thesis assesses the value of the Dynamic Sustainment simulation model as a logistics modeling tool and demonstrates data analysis techniques that can potentially be applied to model results. The secondary purpose is to explore the impact on the maintenance system of varying levels of platform reliability as part of an ongoing effort to provide the Office of the Secretary of Defense with credible analysis for future combat system reliability. The effects of a crew repair team having a high or low repair capability; having a fast or slow spare parts delivery speed; having high, medium, or low system reliability; and high or low numbers of mechanics was measured on maintenance man-hours required at the end of a 72-hour scenario. Twenty-four treatments with varying levels of each factor were designed and imposed on four combat arms brigades. The fourth brigade had 70 percent more vehicles than the other three. Significant effects of all factors except the number of mechanics were found with interaction between those factors. Spare parts delivery speed was ranked high in terms of significance followed by crew repair capability. Slow delivery speed reduced maintenance. Low reliability produced the most maintenance man-hours.
Type
Thesis
Description
Series/Report No
Department
Operations Research
Other Units
Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.).
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Format
xiv, 63 p. : col. ill. ;
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Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
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