Publication:
How the U.S. Air Force Space Command Optimizes Long-Term Investment in Space Systems

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Authors
Brown, Gerald G.
Dell, Robert F.
Holtz, Heath
Newman, Alexandra M.
Subjects
Advisors
Date of Issue
2003
Date
July - August 2003
Publisher
Language
Abstract
United States Air Force Space Command spends billions of dollars each year acquiring and developing launch vehicles and space systems. The space systems in orbit must continually meet defensive and offensive requirements and remain interoperable over time. Space command can launch additional space systems only if it has a launch vehicle of sufficient capacity. Space planners using space and missile optimization analysis (SAMOA) consider a 24-year time horizon when determining which space assets and launch vehicles to fund and procure. A key tool which in SAMOA is an integer linear program called the space command optimizer of utility toolkit (SCOUT) that Space Command uses for long-range planning. SCOUT gives planner insight into the annual funding profiles needed to meet Space Command's acquisition goals. The 1999 portfolio of 74 systems will cost about #310 billion and includes systems that can lift satellites into orbit; yield information on space, surface, and subsurface events, activities, and threats; and destroy terrestrial, airborne, and space targets.
Type
Article
Description
Interfaces, 33, p.p. 1-14.
Series/Report No
Department
Operations Research (OR)
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NPS Report Number
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Citation
Brown, G.G., Dell, R.F., Holtz, H., and Newman, A.M., 2003, “How the U.S. Air Force Space Command Optimizes Long-Term Investment in Space Systems,” Interfaces, 33, p.p. 1-14.
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defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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