Publication:
STRENGTHENING U.S. SECURITY COOPERATION IN THE ASIAN-PACIFIC BY IMPROVING RELATIONS BETWEEN JAPAN AND SOUTH KOREA: THE CASE OF CHILE-ARGENTINA AS A MODEL

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Authors
Agli, Franklin E.
Subjects
U.S. security cooperation
Japan–South Korea relations
Chile-Argentina relations
legacies
historical atrocities
military-to-military relations
arms race
economic tensions
trade wars
CBMs
confidence-building measures
Advisors
Meyskens, Covell F.
Date of Issue
2020-06
Date
Publisher
Monterey, CA; Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
This thesis studies the relationship of Japan–South Korea and Argentina–Chile to seek means to improve future U.S. security cooperation in East Asia. By approaching the Japan–South Korea case from the post-war period, I develop the points of friction that inhibit their improved relations, from historical conflicts, military-to-military relations, and economic interactions. By examining these points of tension, I explore how each factor is linked and why there are certain restrictions on interactions between Japan and South Korea. I examine comparable sources of tension in the Chile and Argentina case—namely memories of historical conflicts, political stability, and trade relations—to find out how Chile and Argentina were able to lessen tensions and develop more cooperative relations. The research found that when approaching the Japan–South Korea relationship, third-party intervention will be the viable choice to achieving sustained relations. Additionally, the use of confidence-building measures (CBMs) with the Japanese–South Korean relationship will support U.S. security cooperation in East Asia. The study notes that CBMs will take time to develop better relations between Japan and South Korea; however, the expectation is that as the partnership grows, CBMs will build trust and meaningful present-day interactions that will eventually overshadow past atrocities.
Type
Thesis
Description
Series/Report No
Department
National Security Affairs (NSA)
Organization
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
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Distribution Statement
Approved for public release. distribution is unlimited
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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