Publication:
MANIFEST DESTINY IN CHINA: A COMPARISON OF THE UNITED STATES AMERICAN INDIAN WARS OF THE 1800S WITH CHINA’S STRIKE HARD CAMPAIGN AGAINST THE UYGHUR MUSLIMS OF XINJIANG PROVINCE

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Authors
Abaldo, Daniel A.
Salbego, Evan F.
Subjects
American Indian
indigenous people
China
Uyghur
cultural imperialism
Advisors
Strawser, Bradley J.
Date of Issue
12
Date
Publisher
Monterey, CA; Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
Historically, empires have sought to subjugate or destroy target populations by any means necessary, up to and including the use of genocide. However, the proliferation of information technology has provided new ways for state-level entities to influence others without the social and political fallout associated with violent acts of imperialism. In order to address this phenomenon, this thesis examines the role of cultural imperialism in the Information Age by comparing and contrasting two case studies: the American Indian Wars and the present-day plight of the Uyghurs in Xinjiang, China. It should be noted that this thesis does not purport to illustrate a vast range of similarities between the two. Rather, very few resemblances actually exist. Among them, geographic expansionism, domestic imperialism, and forced assimilation act as the broader themes through which to compare these overt conflicts of influence. Conversely, the differences in cultures, locations, and points in history provide new opportunities to contrast the efficacy of the techniques employed in either case. This thesis finds that, while violence will likely remain a weapon of influence long into the future, cheaper, more effective options have become the preferred tools for furthering vital national interests through the suppression of opposing cultures.
Type
Thesis
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Department
Defense Analysis (DA)
Defense Analysis (DA)
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Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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