Publication:
The distributed air wing

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Authors
Naccarato, Vincent
Lee, Joong Yang
Wu, Meng Hsi
Ilan, Ittai Bar
Efird, James
Elzner, Benjamin
Morgan, Darrell
Tawoda, Kayla
Wolfe, Evan
Goh, Wei Jun
Subjects
Distributed Air Wing
Dispersed Air Wing Operations
Sea Vex
CVE
UAS-enhanced Self Escort Strike
Expeditionary Air Base
A2AD
Anti-Access
Area Denial
Advisors
Chung, Timothy H.
Date of Issue
2014-06
Date
June 2014
Publisher
Monterey California. Naval Postgraduate School
Language
en_US
Abstract
The development of advanced anti-access/area denial (A2AD) threats by potential adversaries presents a significant challenge to the United States Navy. The proliferation of these threats makes operating an aircraft carrier from contested waters a high-risk endeavor. If a carrier must be withheld from the battle or is put out of action, the entire capability of the air wing is lost. The Systems Engineering process was applied to this problem by exploring a concept called the Distributed Air Wing (DAW). This high-level concept includes various methods to distribute and disperse naval air capabilities from their centralized location on an aircraft carrier. This study outlines the development and analysis of three conceptual designs that fall under the concept of the DAW: a dispersed land and sea basing concept that utilizes carrier-borne Navy and Marine Corps aircraft, a seaborne unmanned aircraft courier system, and a carrier-based unmanned air-to-air vehicle. The analysis within shows that a mixture of these alternatives in varying degrees delivers the Fleet’s most critical capabilities— Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR), Offensive/Defensive Counter Air, and Surface/Land Strike— with less risk than the current Carrier Air Wing (CVW) force structure and operational doctrine.
Type
Thesis
SEA Capstone
Description
Department
Systems Engineering (SE)
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Funder
Format
Citation
Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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