Expeditionary Logistics: A low-cost, large-scale, unmanned, deployable sensor network to support of Airfield Damage Assessment

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Authors
Singh, Gurminder
Prince, Charles
McCarrin, Michael
Davis, Nicholas
Subjects
Airfield Damage Assessment (ADA)
sensor systems
unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs)
Advisors
Date of Issue
2018-04
Date
Presented April 10-12, 2018
Period of Performance: 10/01/2017 - 09/30/2018
Publisher
Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School
Language
en_US
Abstract
Project Summary: Airfield Damage Repair (ADR) is among the most important expeditionary activities for our military. The goal of ADR is to restore a damaged airfield to operational status as quickly as possible. Before the process of ADR can begin, however, the damage to the airfield needs to be assessed. As a result, Airfield Damage Assessment (ADA) has received considerable attention. Often in a damaged airfield, there is an expectation of unexploded ordinances, which makes ADA a slow, difficult, and dangerous process. For this reason, it is best to make ADA completely unmanned and automated. Additionally, ADA needs to be executed as quickly as possible so that ADR can begin and the airfield restored to a usable condition. Among other modalities, tower-based monitoring and remote sensor systems are often used for ADA. There is now an opportunity to investigate the use of commercial-off-the-shelf, low-cost, automated sensor systems for automated damage detection. By developing a combination of ground-based and unmanned aerial systems (UAS) sensor systems, we demonstrate ADA to be completed more swiftly and in a safe, efficient, and cost-effective manner.
Type
Report
Description
NPS NRP Executive Summary
Department
Computer Science (CS)
Organization
Naval Research Program
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
NPS-18-N116-A
Sponsors
Funder
NPS-18-N116-A
Format
4 p.
Citation
Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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