Publication:
Reforming Intelligence: Democracy and Effectiveness

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Authors
Boraz, Steven C.
Bruneau, Thomas C.
Subjects
Advisors
Date of Issue
2006-07
Date
Publisher
Monterey, CA; Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
One of the most difficult and least explored challenges confronting new democracies is that of reforming their intelligence services. Even for long-established democracies, the need for civilian agencies dedicated to protecting national security through the gathering and analysis of intelligence (as well as occasional covert action on the basis of such intelligence) poses serious problems. Democracy requires openness in the flow of information and discussion, while intelligence work often demands secrecy. Maintaining agencies to do such work in the midst of a generally open political culture is a challenge for any democracy. Democratizing or newly democratic countries, however, must deal with the even more arduous task of transforming intelligence bureaucracies that once served undemocratic regimes.
Type
Article
Description
Series/Report No
Department
National Security Affairs (NSA)
Organization
Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Funder
Format
Citation
Journal of Democracy, Volume 17, Number 3, July 2006
Distribution Statement
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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