Publication:
A comparative analysis of current and planned small arms weapon systems

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Authors
Jenkins, Shawn T.
Lowrey, Douglas S.
Subjects
M16
M4
M249
Carbine
Rifle
SAW
Squad Automatic Weapon
Laser Aiming Light
Reflex Sight
XM8
AN/PAQ-4C
AN/PEQ-2A
M68
M145
Machine Gun
Advisors
Naegle, Brad R.
Marvel, Orin E.
Date of Issue
2004-12
Date
December 2004
Publisher
Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
Today, the threat to the United States is no longer a symmetric enemy with massive armor formations. No longer will the battlefield of the future resemble the rolling plains of Europe. Today's enemy is more asymmetric than ever, choosing not to meet the might of the US military head on, but in a series of small engagements against traditional non-combat arms units. The fight will take place most often in built up areas, where the US military machine cannot bring its full force to bear on a technologically inferior foe. Each soldier, regardless of job or unit, must have an increased capability to deal with this threat. As the Army develops new or improved tactical equipment for the individual soldier to combat this threat, it must answer one key question. Does the new system provide more capability and/or reduce cost? Current systems in use today are battle proven and meet this need, however many are aging and there are alternative systems available. The purpose of this project is to determine which weapon system provides the best value to the Department of Defense. It does this by examining the background, capabilities, and cost of each system. It then uses a quantitative and qualitative approach to determine which weapon system is more advantageous in terms of suitability and effectiveness, and which system provides the more cost effective solution.
Type
Description
MBA Professional Report
Department
Graduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP)
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Funder
Format
xiv, 59 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 28 cm.
Citation
Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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