Publication:
Asymmetries, Anthropology, and War

dc.contributor.authorSimons, Anna
dc.contributor.departmentDefense Analysis (DA)
dc.date2011-10
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-15T18:29:55Z
dc.date.available2014-01-15T18:29:55Z
dc.date.issued2011-10
dc.descriptionPointer (Journal of the Singapore Armed Forces), 37 (2), October 2011.en_US
dc.description.abstractPolicy makers continue to want to believe that with just a bit more effort, and greater cross-cultural understanding, their militaries can somehow shape better than they can smash. Many of those who eschew the use of force also believe that disciplines like anthropology really can deliver bloodless solutions. But, at best, this is wishful thinking. As terrible as it may seem to advocate a more honest consideration of force, in actuality nothing is likelier to stand Western militaries in better stead. Ironically, too, nothing less than the proven willingness to use overwhelming force will protect what finesse requires: respect—if not mutual, then at least grudging respect.en_US
dc.identifier.citationSimons, Anna, “Asymmetries, Anthropology, and War,” Pointer (Journal of the Singapore Armed Forces), 37 (2), October 2011.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10945/38354
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.subject.authorAsymmetrical Warfareen_US
dc.subject.authorCounter-Insurgencyen_US
dc.subject.authorLaws of Waren_US
dc.subject.authorMilitary Psychologyen_US
dc.titleAsymmetries, Anthropology, and Waren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dspace.entity.typePublication
Files
Original bundle
Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Name:
Simons_asymmetries_anthropology_and_war.pdf
Size:
1.97 MB
Format:
Adobe Portable Document Format
Collections