POLICING THE PACIFIC: A PATH TO BUILDING LAW ENFORCEMENT CAPACITY IN THE FREELY ASSOCIATED STATES

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Authors
Miller, Ronald
Subjects
Pacific Island Countries
PIC
Freely Associated States
FAS
Oceania
CNMI
Republic of Palau
Federated States of Micronesia
FSM
American Samoa
Republic of the Marshall Islands
Guam
JIATF South
Pacific Strategy
crime
policing
capacity building
Australia
OPBAT
JIATF West
INDO-PACOM
Indo-Pacific
COFA
IUU
maritime domain awareness
MDA
Pacific Patrol Boat Program
PPBP
Pacific Maritime Security Program
PMSP
Law Enforcement Domain Evaluation Model
LE DEM
Advisors
Brown, Shannon A.
Date of Issue
2022-12
Date
Publisher
Monterey, CA; Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
The United States shares a special relationship with the Freely Associated States (FAS), resulting in a virtual extension of the United States. Given the importance of the Pacific Islands Countries (PIC) and the virtually borderless linkages of the FAS as a result of the Compacts of Free Association (COFA) agreements, the United States must look for ways to comprehensively invest in policing capacity-building efforts within the region. By analyzing Australia’s efforts in the Melanesia region and the actions of the United States in the Caribbean to combat drugs, this thesis proposes a resources-optimized policy framework to overlay onto the Pacific. This thesis uses the Law Enforcement Domain Evaluation Model (LE DEM) to integrate the two policy approaches. The LE DEM incorporates the continuum of preventative measures to response options to enable the recommendation of a comprehensive policing capacity-building strategy in the Pacific. Those recommendations include expanding and equipping the Joint Interagency Task Force (JIATF) West; establishing a Micronesian fusion center; creating four supporting specialized joint task forces; and enabling digital and chemical forensics, maritime domain awareness, and financial auditing. In addition, it proposes five lines of investment efforts for joint technology and asset transfers that should be executed to enable the region to hedge against the evolving Pacific transnational threats.
Type
Thesis
Description
Series/Report No
Department
National Security Affairs (CHDS)
Organization
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Funder
Format
Citation
Distribution Statement
Approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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