Security providers: obstacles to effectiveness in democracies

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Authors
Bruneau, Thomas C.
Subjects
Civil-military relations
National security councils
National security strategy
Political incentives
Security providers
Advisors
Date of Issue
2017
Date
Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Language
Abstract
To usefully discuss security, one must analyze the security providers states utilize to enhance international and domestic security. These are the armed forces, police, and intelligence agencies. This paper analyzes the implications of democratization on the requirements-posited as strategies, resources, and coordination institutions-these providers require in order to achieve the goals civilian leaders set for them. In analyzing case studies of how nations implement six different tasks, it becomes clear that the absence, or weakness, in any of the requirements leads to serious weakness in implementation. Two findings from the case studies are particularly important for policy. First, presidents, who are elected directly and for fixed terms, may ignore or even abolish institutions, including national security councils, that are created to coordinate policy. Second, as civilians are in control, if they lack clear incentives they are not willing to provide the necessary requirements for the security providers.
Type
Article
Description
The article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17419166.2017.1359091
Series/Report No
Department
National Security Affairs (NSA)
Organization
Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.) Monterey, California
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Funder
Format
27 p.
Citation
T.C. Bruneau, "Security providers: obstacles to effectiveness in democracies," Democracy and Security, v.13, no.2, (2017), pp. 1-27
Distribution Statement
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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