Publication:
PATTERNS OF EXPLAINING WATER PROTESTS IN MEXICO

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Authors
Barajas, Eduardo
Subjects
water privatization
Mexico
protests
Chile
Bolivia
Aguascalientes
Mexico City
state capacity
regulatory framework
water pollution
Advisors
Meierding, Emily L.
Date of Issue
2018-12
Date
Publisher
Monterey, CA; Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
Mexicans only protest water privatization when they feel they are getting a bad deal on issues, such as poor water service, poor water quality, or unaffordable water price. In general, protesters blame privatization when they do not get what they pay for. Issues subsumed under water privatization and the threat to increase privatization are the most significant causal factors of water-related protests in Mexico. Protesters associate bad water service, poor water quality, and unaffordable water prices with water privatization. By analyzing water privatization in Mexico City and Aguascalientes, this thesis finds that state capacity and regulatory frameworks are key factors affecting the success of water privatization. In order to prevent future protests over water privatization, this thesis recommends the following practices: first, Mexico should strengthen its state capacity by reforming its public institutions; second, Mexico should strengthen its regulatory framework to ensure adequate governmental oversight over water companies. Finally, the government of Mexico should promote not-for-profit water companies as a way to avoid predatory practices from private water companies and governmental corruption. Subsidies should accompany each of these recommendations to guarantee access to water at an affordable price for everyone.
Type
Thesis
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Series/Report No
Department
National Security Affairs (NSA)
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Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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