Publication:
Performance of coded coherent FSK lightwave system with noncoherent detection

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Authors
Neely, Thomas Elliott
Subjects
Optical communications
Laser phase noise
Coding
Advisors
Ha, Tri T.
Collins, Daniel J.
Date of Issue
1993-03
Date
March 1993
Publisher
Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School
Language
en_US
Abstract
The original coherent lightwave systems were expected to offer significant performance gains relative to standard direct detection systems. This expectation has not been realized due to the effects of laser phase noise. The laser phase noise process results in the integration of a random variable that transitions over the integration period from a Gaussian distribution to a uniform distribution. The use of convolutional coding effectively replaces a single bit time, with its mostly noncoherently integrating latter portion, by several more coherently integrating bits. This primary bit-time effect comes in addition to the normal coding effect of efficiently trading bandwidth for error performance. The improvement in performance brought about from coding may enable coherent systems to live up to previous expectations. The contributions of this thesis include the visualization of the phase noise process, the efficient computation of the laser phase noise power factor probability density function, and the computation of performance curves for uncoded and coded systems. Additional sections on coherent lightwave systems and coding provide tutorial information. A potential military application is discussed, along with practical implementation issues.
Type
Thesis
Description
Series/Report No
Department
Department of Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Organization
Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Funder
Format
71 p.
Citation
Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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