LESSONS LEARNED AND UNLEARNED: U.S. FIELD ARTILLERY SINCE THE END OF WWII

dc.contributor.advisorMoran, Daniel J.
dc.contributor.authorDeveraux, Brennan S.
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.contributor.secondreaderSheehan, John M.
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-21T00:25:30Z
dc.date.available2020-08-21T00:25:30Z
dc.date.issued2020-06
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines the adaptation of U.S. indirect-fire capabilities since 1945, with reference to three potential drivers of military innovation: new technology, combat experience, and external threats. Throughout this period U.S. artillery platforms and munitions—alongside the maneuver forces they were designed to support—have grown in complexity, lethality, accuracy, range, and mobility. Current U.S. artillery munitions nevertheless lag behind those of other modern militaries in important respects, including target-seeking rounds and the destruction of armor. In addition, today’s artillery platforms—towed and self-propelled alike—are too slow for a high-tempo fight. Thus, although capabilities have developed dramatically, in a large-scale combat operation, modern U.S. artillery would likely play a minor role. This thesis examines 70 years of artillery development, and concludes that apart from the immediate pressures of active conflict, external threats are the primary driver of adaptation. Thus, current and future projects are likely to revolve around a singular focus: preparing to combat a peer adversary. In this regard, this thesis offers developmental recommendations to help the artillery branch maintain its hard-won historical position as the King of Battle.en_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release. distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.recognitionOutstanding Thesisen_US
dc.description.serviceCaptain, United States Armyen_US
dc.identifier.thesisid32494
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10945/65502
dc.publisherMonterey, CA; Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNPS Outstanding Theses and Dissertations
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.subject.authoradaptationen_US
dc.subject.authorartilleryen_US
dc.subject.authorCopperheaden_US
dc.subject.authorcounter-insurgencyen_US
dc.subject.authorCrusaderen_US
dc.subject.authordirect supporten_US
dc.subject.authorExcaliburen_US
dc.subject.authorfamily of scatterable minesen_US
dc.subject.authorFASCAMen_US
dc.subject.authorfield artilleryen_US
dc.subject.authorfirebaseen_US
dc.subject.authorguided multiple launch rocket systemen_US
dc.subject.authorGMLRSen_US
dc.subject.authorimproved conventional munitionen_US
dc.subject.authorICMen_US
dc.subject.authorindirect fireen_US
dc.subject.authorinnovationen_US
dc.subject.authormodernizationen_US
dc.subject.authormodularizationen_US
dc.subject.authormunitionen_US
dc.subject.authorPentomicen_US
dc.subject.authorprecision guidance kiten_US
dc.subject.authorPGKen_US
dc.subject.authorprecision guided munitionsen_US
dc.subject.authorPGMen_US
dc.subject.authormaneuver forcesen_US
dc.subject.authorsense and destroy armoren_US
dc.subject.authorSADARMen_US
dc.subject.authortactical nuclear weaponsen_US
dc.titleLESSONS LEARNED AND UNLEARNED: U.S. FIELD ARTILLERY SINCE THE END OF WWIIen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dspace.entity.typePublication
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Strategic Studies)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Strategic Studies)en_US
relation.isSeriesOfPublicationc5e66392-520c-4aaf-9b4f-370ce82b601f
relation.isSeriesOfPublication.latestForDiscoveryc5e66392-520c-4aaf-9b4f-370ce82b601f
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