Publication:
Recycled bricks: exploring opportunities to reintegrate returning American foreign fighters using existing models

dc.contributor.advisorWollman, Lauren
dc.contributor.advisorHalladay, Carolyn
dc.contributor.authorScott, Edward Francis, III
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.dateDec-16
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-09T00:02:43Z
dc.date.available2017-02-09T00:02:43Z
dc.date.issued2016-12
dc.description.abstractForeign fighters have been engaged in conflicts for hundreds of years, but the sheer number of foreign fighters who travel to Iraq and Syria during the last five years is unprecedented. The United States is not sure what to do with American ex-foreign fighters who leave their group and want to return to the States and peacefully reintegrate back into society, since currently there is no reintegration program for ex-foreign fighters. This thesis explores how the United States can develop an ex-foreign fighter reintegration strategy using existing, analogous models. This study identifies two groups that possess similar characteristics to foreign fighters: U.S. street gangs and the U.S. military. Utilizing the conceptual frameworks of street gangs and the military, the conceptual life-cycle of foreign fighters is detailed to ascertain the practicality of developing a foreign-fighter reintegration program utilizing the existing reintegration programs of street gangs and the military. Based on the findings that foreign fighters, street gang members, and formerly deployed service members are very similar, I recommend the development of a multidisciplinary reintegration program for retuning ex-foreign fighters using specific aspects of each previously referenced reintegration program.en_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
dc.description.serviceSupervisory Federal Air Marshal, Federal Air Marshal Service, Atlantic City, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/recycledbricksex1094551613
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10945/51613
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is reserved by the copyright owner.en_US
dc.subject.authorforeign fighteren_US
dc.subject.authorreintegrationen_US
dc.subject.authorstreet gangen_US
dc.subject.authormilitary service memberen_US
dc.subject.authorlife-cycleen_US
dc.subject.authorsocial identity theoryen_US
dc.subject.authorjoining a groupen_US
dc.subject.authoractivity in groupen_US
dc.subject.authordesistanceen_US
dc.subject.authordisengagementen_US
dc.subject.authornational strategyen_US
dc.subject.authorNational Strategy to Combat Terrorist Travelen_US
dc.subject.authorIslamic Stateen_US
dc.subject.authorFinal Report of the Task Force on Combating Terrorist and Foreign Fighter Travelen_US
dc.subject.authorPTSDen_US
dc.subject.authorTBIen_US
dc.subject.authorPMDen_US
dc.subject.authordeploymenten_US
dc.titleRecycled bricks: exploring opportunities to reintegrate returning American foreign fighters using existing modelsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dspace.entity.typePublication
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
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