Publication:
A communications strategy for disaster relief

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Authors
Folsom, Eric Michael
Subjects
disaster relief
emergency response
information communications and technology
integration
interface
cloud
security
disaster response
communications strategy
Advisors
Steckler, Brian
Date of Issue
2015-03
Date
March 2015
Publisher
Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
The problem with current international disaster relief is ineffective communication, coordination, cooperation, and collaboration (4C). Ineffective international 4C allows chaos and anarchy to significantly hinder disaster-relief efforts. After action reports (AARs) and disaster relief (DR) materials were examined to identify system-level issues during DR missions. These issues were examined to determine if DR exhibits characteristics of a wicked problem. The results of systems-thinking analysis show that anarchy, social complexity, and stress within the DR system have a negative impact on all components of the system. To improve the effectiveness of DR missions and help mission teams to present a unified front for DR, anarchy, social complexity, and stress must be reduced. This work proposes a communication strategy for DR missions that harnesses capabilities of information communication and technology (ICT) solutions, introduces a cloud-based hierarchical trust model, and outlines a common integration interface. The strategy encourages open and transparent 4C between DR mission teams and the international DR community. Properly implemented, this communication strategy could reduce system-level anarchy and social complexity, resulting in reduced post-disaster damage, injuries, and loss of life.
Type
Thesis
Description
Series/Report No
Department
Graduate School of Operational and Information Sciences
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NPS Report Number
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Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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