Publication:
SOFTWARE DEFINED CUSTOMIZATION OF NETWORK PROTOCOLS WITH LAYER 4.5

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Authors
Lukaszewski, Daniel F.
Subjects
software defined networks
protocol customization
agile networks
Advisors
Xie, Geoffrey G.
Kroll, Joshua A.
Kolsch, Mathias N.
Stanica, Pantelimon
Rohrer, Justin P.
Wiegand, Karl, USN (Reserves)
Date of Issue
2022-09
Date
Publisher
Monterey, CA; Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
The rise of software defined networks, programmable data planes, and host level kernel programmability gives rise to highly specialized enterprise networks. One form of network specialization is protocol customization, which traditionally extends existing protocols with additional features, primarily for security and performance reasons. However, the current methodologies to deploy protocol customizations lack the agility to support rapidly changing customization needs. This dissertation designs and evaluates the first software-defined customization architecture capable of distributing and continuously managing protocol customizations within enterprise or datacenter networks. Our unifying architecture is capable of performing per-process customizations, embedding per-network security controls, and aiding the traversal of customized application flows through otherwise problematic middlebox devices. Through the design and evaluation of the customization architecture, we further our understanding of, and provide robust support for, application transparent protocol customizations. We conclude with the first ever demonstration of active application flow "hot-swapping" of protocol customizations, a capability not currently supported in operational networks.
Type
Thesis
Description
Series/Report No
Department
Computer Science (CS)
Other Units
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Office of Naval Research, Arlington, VA 22203
Funder
Format
Citation
Distribution Statement
Approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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