Development of Techniques for Investigating Energy Contributions to Target Deformation and Penetration During Reactive Projectile Hypervelocity Impact

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Authors
Peters, Max
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Date of Issue
2011-07
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Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School
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Abstract
There are longstanding interests in the effects during hypervelocity penetration of projectiles and shaped charge jets through water and through water submerged targets. The effects of apparent reaction during the penetration of reactive aluminum jets through an inert fluid and water are examined in this research, where there is an attempt to differentiate the causes of observed target deformation and volume displacement. Specific developed routines in ANSYS AUTODYN finite element code are used to characterize the jet and to estimate penetration for comparison with experimental results. This reports covers shaped charge, penetration and metal combustion theory which is crucial for the determined process. The jet criteria is examined using ANSYS AUTODYN, determining the jet characteristics occurring which are likely to have strong influences on the penetration process. The penetration process is simulated by a special developed technique using this software. The portions of the jet responsible for the deformation and the liquid displacement are identified, and the fraction of the energy causing the plastic deformation is estimated using 3D Explicit Dynamics WORKBENCH code. Experimental and simulation results are compared and possible reasons for observed differences are demonstrated and evaluated. The predictions are found to be in good agreement with the tests.
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Description
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Department
Dept. of Physics
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NPS Report Number
NPS-PH-11-006
Sponsors
Helmut Schmidt University University of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg Holstenhofweg 85, 22043 Hamburg Germany
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This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.