Babysteps Developing Multilateral Institutions in the Arctic

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Authors
Jorgensen, Henrick Jedig
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Date of Issue
2011-04-22
Date
4/22/2011
Publisher
Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
Program for Culture and Conflict Studies
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Abstract
"This paper assumes that the ongoing quest for power in the Arctic can be regulated, and that the Arctic coastal states have a common interest in establishing fora, rules and regulations to deal with actual and potential future challenges -- and both within the security domain and in other -- and softer domains. But the existing fora that could be used for dialogue and cooperation in the Arctic are all established on the premises of the Cold War and on the premise, that Arctic change is taking place at a slow and incremental pace. Consequently they are insufficiently institutionalized and lacking in power and therefore incapable of assuming an overarching responsibility for historical reasons. This paper discusses the need, possibilities and challenges to empowering the weak existing fora with the aim of increasing the degree of practical and binding Arctic cooperation and reducing the level of militarisation and risk of conflict against the option of establishing new and more potent fora. The paper will discuss the future need for institution-building with the short term aim of being able to keep up with the pace of Arctic change and the long term aim of establishing Arctic institutions with the potential to carry out UN [United Nations] mandates under Article VIII of the UN Charter."
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Description
This article was published in Culture and Conflict Review (Earth Day 2011), v.5 no.2
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Citation
Culture and Conflict Review (Earth Day 2011), v.5 no.2
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This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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