Publication:
National security councils: their potential functions in democratic civil-military relations

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Authors
Bruneau, Thomas C.
Matei, Florina Cristiana (Cris)
Sakoda, Sak
Subjects
Advisors
Date of Issue
2009
Date
Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Language
Abstract
This article builds on recent contributions to the study of civil–military relations (CMR) by broadening the focus beyond democratic control to encompass other dimensions and levels of analysis. There are problems with the classical literature, as has recently been noted by some scholars. The first problem is that CMR has dealt almost exclusively with issues of control. In the more established democracies, the literature focuses on how control is exercised; in newer democracies, on how it can be achieved. What is scarce in the literature is attention to what the military and other security forces do; that is, their roles and missions and how effectively they implement them. Second, the CMR literature consists mainly of detailed case studies that are difficult to generalize to other times and places.
Type
Article
Description
The article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14751790903201406
Series/Report No
Department
National Security Affairs (NSA)
Organization
Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.) Monterey, California
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Funder
Format
17 p.
Citation
T.C. Bruneau, F.C. Matei, S. Sakoda, "National security councils: their potential functions in democratic civil-military relations," Defense & Security Analysis, V. 25, no. 3, (September 2009), pp. 255-269.
Distribution Statement
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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