Publication:
Hybrid power system for remote communications stations

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Authors
Pietras, Christopher R.
Subjects
Hybrid power system
Solar power system
Wind power system
Photovoltaic
Advisors
Michael, Sherif
Date of Issue
1993-09
Date
September 1993
Publisher
Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School
Language
en_US
Abstract
The United States Coast Guard is upgrading communications equipment at remote sites in Alaska in support of the Coastal Voice Distress Network. The VHF-FM Search and Rescue sites are powered by a primary power system consisting of a thermoelectric generator. Thermoelectric generators are very inefficient devices which consume vast quantities of propane to create electricity. The upgrade necessitates added power requirements on the power supply system at the remote sites. These requirements compel the redesign and/or upgrade of the power system. If thermoelectric generat -s continue to be utilized as the primary power system, additional helicopter visits to the sites to deliver propane will be required. These helicopter flights are costly and sometimes hazardous due to severe weather. This thesis investigates a variety of power system options capable of providing electrical power to the communications sites. Specifically, this thesis addresses three objectives. The first is a discussion of current alternative energy source technology available to supply the required power. The second is an analysis of the specific power system requirements and constraints. The third objective and major thrust of the research, is the design of a reliable hybrid power system for this application, capable of utilizing the inexhaustible natural energy available at the remote sites. The engineering parameters for a hybrid power system were studied and calculations made based on commercially available components. The difficulties in the design due to extreme weather conditions and unavailability of natural power resource information at specific sites are addressed. This thesis presents the groundwork associated with hybrid power system designs for use at remote communications sites.The United States Coast Guard is upgrading communications equipment at remote sites in Alaska in support of the Coastal Voice Distress Network. The VHF-FM Search and Rescue sites are powered by a primary power system consisting of a thermoelectric generator. Thermoelectric generators are very inefficient devices which consume vast quantities of propane to create electricity. The upgrade necessitates added power requirements on the power supply system at the remote sites. These requirements compel the redesign and/or upgrade of the power system. If thermoelectric generat -s continue to be utilized as the primary power system, additional helicopter visits to the sites to deliver propane will be required. These helicopter flights are costly and sometimes hazardous due to severe weather. This thesis investigates a variety of power system options capable of providing electrical power to the communications sites. Specifically, this thesis addresses three objectives. The first is a discussion of current alternative energy source technology available to supply the required power. The second is an analysis of the specific power system requirements and constraints. The third objective and major thrust of the research, is the design of a reliable hybrid power system for this application, capable of utilizing the inexhaustible natural energy available at the remote sites. The engineering parameters for a hybrid power system were studied and calculations made based on commercially available components. The difficulties in the design due to extreme weather conditions and unavailability of natural power resource information at specific sites are addressed. This thesis presents the groundwork associated with hybrid power system designs for use at remote communications sites.
Type
Thesis
Description
Series/Report No
Department
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Organization
Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Funder
Format
174 p.
Citation
Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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