Publication:
Homeland Security: Intelligence Indications and Warning; Strategic Insights: v.1, issue 10 (December 2002)

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Authors
Luikart, Kenneth A.
Subjects
Advisors
Date of Issue
2002-12
Date
December 2002
Publisher
Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
September 11, 2001 demonstrated that policy makers and intelligence organizations had conducted business in traditional ways, not in response to today's threats to our nation. The attacks in September suggest that inadequate information sharing between law enforcement and national intelligence agencies led to lost opportunities to thwart the attacks launched by Al-Qaeda. Little has yet been done to fix many of these problems. The nation has failed to formulate significant changes in the way it tasks, collects, analyzes, produces and disseminates intelligence information. The architecture needed to provide intelligence for homeland defense has not yet emerged. The September 11 attacks are a watershed event that should change our current intelligence organization, perhaps resulting in legislation as important as the National Security Act of 1947.
Type
Article
Description
This article appeared in Strategic Insights (December 2002), v.1 no.10
Department
National Security Affairs (NSA)
Other Units
Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.) Monterey, California
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Funder
Format
Citation
Strategic Insights, v.1, issue 10 (December 2002)
Distribution Statement
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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