Publication:
Warfare Innovation Continuum (WIC) Workshop Logistics in Contested Environments September 2019 After Action Report

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Authors
Englehorn, Lyla
Subjects
Advisors
Date of Issue
2019-11-14
Date
14 November 2019
Publisher
Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School
Language
en_US
Abstract
This Consortium for Robotics and Unmanned Systems Education and Research (CRUSER) sponsored Warfare Innovation Continuum (WIC) workshop was held 23-26 September 2019 on the campus of the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey, California. The three and a half day experience allowed NPS students focused interaction with faculty, staff, fleet officers, and visiting engineers from Navy labs and industry. The workshop culminated in a morning of final concept briefs and fruitful discussion regarding the role of unmanned systems in the future naval force. This workshop also directly supported the Secretary of the Navy's (SECNAV) direction that CRUSER foster the development of actionable operational concepts for robotic and autonomous systems within naval warfare areas and work with our industry partners. The September 2019 workshop "Logistics in Contested Environments" tasked participants to apply emerging technologies to shape the way we fight. Within a near future extended conflict scenario, concept generation teams were given a design challenge: How might emerging technologies be employed to support logistics in contested environments to accomplish missions more effectively and/or with less risk? With embedded facilitators, teams had three days to meet that challenge, and presented their best concepts on the final morning of the workshop.
Type
Report
Description
Naval Warfare Studies Institute (NWSI)
Warfare Innovation Continuum (WIC)
Department
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Consortium for Robotics and Unmanned Systems Education and Research (CRUSER)
Funder
Format
91 p.
Citation
Distribution Statement
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.