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Developing an operational and tactical methodology for Incorporating existing technologies to produce the highest Probability of detecting an individual wearing an IED

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Authors
Minukas, Michael
Subjects
Advisors
Fox, William
Date of Issue
2010-06
Date
Publisher
Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
Among the many weapons currently used by terrorist organizations against public welfare and coalition forces in Iraq and Afghanistan, human-born Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) present a significant threat. Commonly referred to as "suicide bombers," these individuals enter crowded public areas in order to detonate the IED, inflicting lethal damage to the surrounding individuals. Constructed of non-standard parts and hidden under layers of clothing, these humanborn IEDs go undetected until detonated. Currently, there are no detection systems that can identify suicide bombers at adequate standoff distances. The purpose of this research is to develop a methodology that combines current technologies to increase the probability of identifying a suicide bomber at a checkpoint or marketplace with an adequate standoff distance. The proposed methodology will employ each sensor technology incorporating unique detection threshold values. We will analyze our proposed methodology utilizing a simulation model that provides both the probability of detecting a bomber and the probability of a false detection. These simulations will allow us to determine the threshold values for each sensor that result in the best probability of detection of a suicide bomber and allows for a small probability of false detections.
Type
Thesis
Description
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Organization
Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
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Format
xviii, 111 p. : ill. (some col.) ;
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Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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