Publication:
Serbia and Montenegro: together forever or one-night stand?

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Authors
Tarquinto, Michael S
Subjects
Serbia and Montenegro
Yugoslavia
independence
nationalism
material interests
European Union
ICTY;
Advisors
Leslie, John
Garrett, Stephen
Date of Issue
2005-06
Date
June 2005
Publisher
Monterey California. Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
Throughout the 1990's the republics of the Former Yugoslavia fought a civil war resulting in the worst atrocities seen on European soil since World War II. The international community stood idly by while combatants in Slovenia and, especially, Croatia used techniques such as concentration camps, torture, rape, and murder to attain their goals of "ethnically pure" societies. Despite intervening in the conflicts in Bosnia and Herzegovina from 1992-1995 and in Kosovo from 1998-1999, thousands suffered on an even greater scale than before. When the republic of Montenegro, still under the oppressive rule of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic, began making moves towards independence, again the international community decided that inaction was not an option. With significant arbitration led by the European Union, Serbia and Montenegro peacefully agreed to forming a loose union and delaying any efforts to create independent states. It is critical to understand why intervention worked in this case and not in the previous attempts with Bosnia and Herzegovina and Kosovo. Believing that international actors can affect state behavior without considering other factors can result in faulty policy decisions and not achieve the desired outcomes.
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Series/Report No
Department
Department of National Security Affairs.
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Format
x, 81 p. ; 28 cm.
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