Publication:
SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE DESIGN AND VALIDATION METHODS FOR MICROGRID SYSTEMS

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Authors
Peterson, Christopher J.
Subjects
microgrids
risk analysis
systems architecture
reliability
verification
validation
resiliency
Advisors
Giammarco, Kristin M.
Van Bossuyt, Douglas
Date of Issue
2019-09
Date
Publisher
Monterey, CA; Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
This thesis develops a methodology and novel metric for the design, verification and validation of microgrids for resiliency objectives. A systems engineering analysis identifies the microgrid function as providing power to facilities to enable mission accomplishment. Microgrids can meet the need of Department of Defense (DoD) facilities to continue missions by providing power for critical loads when utility power is lost. Previous research and existing tools for microgrid design and assessment do not adequately address resiliency in terms of mission accomplishment. The resiliency metric developed in this thesis, defined as the expected lifecycle mission impact (ELMI), quantifies microgrid resiliency in terms of its ability to minimize mission impact against all potential threats to power disruption. This thesis demonstrates the methodology and metric in a case study using a microgrid design that is representative of existing microgrids at DoD installations. The case study demonstrates the methodology using a set of scenarios including typical equipment failure, potential deliberate attacks, and natural disasters. The case study also demonstrates the method by applying it to evaluate the resiliency of different microgrid designs. This thesis recommends facility managers apply metrics and methods that evaluate microgrid resiliency in terms of mission impact and consider a realistic and complete set of scenarios that could disrupt power.
Type
Thesis
Description
Department
Systems Engineering (SE)
Organization
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NPS Report Number
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Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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