Publication:
FLYING DIRTY: EVTOL CASEVAC ON THE CONTAMINATED BATTLEFIELD

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Authors
Hicks, Michael J.
Stoodley, John C.
Gossen, Ryan R.
Subjects
chemical
biological
radiological
nuclear
CBRN
casualty evacuation
CASEVAC
electric vertical takeoff and landing
eVTOL
autonomous aircraft
innovation adoption
deterrence
Advisors
Jamison, Thomas
Date of Issue
2022-06
Date
Publisher
Monterey, CA; Naval Postgraduate School
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Abstract
The American military’s reliance on manned airpower on the modern battlefield invites a critical vulnerability for great power adversaries to target with chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) weapons. Modern efforts to increase combat effectiveness are incremental improvements to decades-old technology that fail to fundamentally change how the Joint Force fights in a contaminated environment. Ongoing military adoption of emerging commercial aviation technology could be readily leveraged to shore up this critical vulnerability. By presenting three articles intended to address distinct aspects of this capability, this capstone aims to demonstrate that unmanned electric vertical takeoff and landing (eVTOL) aircraft can remove the aircrews from a dangerous and dirty task, preserving manned combat power for the broader war effort. However, the military must overcome both technical and cultural barriers for adoption to be successful. These barriers can be overcome by establishing and leveraging advocacy networks and tying innovative solutions to operational challenges. To ignore the promise that these future technologies present will risk remaining vulnerable to a credible threat in a future great power conflict.
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Distribution Statement
Approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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