REDUCING NAVAL FOSSIL FUEL CONSUMPTION AT SEA IN THE 21ST CENTURY

dc.contributor.advisorNussbaum, Daniel A.
dc.contributor.advisorPoree, Kelley
dc.contributor.authorGoldstein, Jaron Z.
dc.contributor.authorGeorge, Jason P.
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Defense Management (DDM)
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Defense Management (DDM)
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-11T00:14:34Z
dc.date.available2022-02-11T00:14:34Z
dc.date.issued2021-12
dc.description.abstractClimate change negatively impacts the Navy's ability to conduct its missions and represents a serious threat to the safety, sovereignty, and future prosperity of the United States. In his Executive Order 14008 dated 27 January 2021, President Joe Biden remarked that current climate considerations are essential to U.S. foreign policy and national security. The Department of Defense is one of the largest single consumers of fossil fuel in the United States. For example, in 2020 the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) procured over $3.3 billion in fuel for the Navy. It will be the view in this thesis that the motivation and the means exist today, more so than any other point in the Navy's history, to decrease fossil fuel use while increasing operational readiness, and that Navy surface small-combatant ships currently consume more fossil fuel in their daily operations than would otherwise be permitted through the implementation of certain fuel conservation technologies. That is, by updating the fleet the Navy can reduce fossil fuel use and carbon emissions.en_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release. Distribution is unlimited.en_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Commander, United States Navyen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Commander, United States Navyen_US
dc.identifier.curriculumcode815, Acquisitions & Contract Management
dc.identifier.curriculumcode815, Acquisitions & Contract Management
dc.identifier.thesisid37123
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10945/68783
dc.publisherMonterey, CA; Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.subject.authorfuelen_US
dc.subject.authorefficiencyen_US
dc.subject.authortechnologyen_US
dc.subject.authorgreen energyen_US
dc.subject.authorenergyen_US
dc.titleREDUCING NAVAL FOSSIL FUEL CONSUMPTION AT SEA IN THE 21ST CENTURYen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.typeMBA Professional Projecten_US
dspace.entity.typePublication
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineMaster of Business Administrationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineMaster of Business Administrationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Business Administrationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Business Administrationen_US
Files
Original bundle
Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Name:
21Dec_Goldstein_George.pdf
Size:
1.98 MB
Format:
Adobe Portable Document Format
Collections