Publication:
The costs and benefits of high speed vessels relative to traditional C-17 military airlift

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Authors
Strenge, Thomas
Ralston, Kevin W.
Subjects
High Speed Vessel
High Speed Ferries
Cost-benefit Analysis
WestPac Express
Advisors
Gue, Kevin R.
Henderson, David R.
Date of Issue
2003-12
Date
December 2003
Publisher
Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
This cost-benefit analysis conducted on behalf of MSC compared HSVs against C-17 aircraft. Using financial and operational data garnered from the WestPac Express, as well as third-party research, the researchers investigated the following questions: Is the HSV a better choice for intra-theater lift than AMC? Should DoD buy or lease? Should the crew be military or civilian? What other theaters require an intra-theater lift platform? How many HSVs does DoD need? The results indicate that in ranges of up to 1,500 nautical miles, HSVs have a speed advantage over C-17 airlift. One HSV can move a single battalion of Marines, whereas AMC requires seventeen C-17 aircraft, a number rarely available for such a mission. Additionally, during routine FY03 operations, WestPac Express incurred costs of $1 2 million. This saved $8 .7 million compared to an estimated AMC cost of $2 0.7 million. The study also recommends bareboat leasing to take advantage of the increased operational flexibility. In the absence of significant cost differences, civilian manning is superior to military manning due to organizational fit. The study concludes with a recommendation that MSC institutionalize HSV service in the III MEF AOR and expand the service to all other maritime theaters.
Type
Description
MBA Professional Report
Department
Graduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP)
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Funder
Format
xvi, 59 p. : col. ill. ; 28 cm.
Citation
Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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