Steam condensation: putting surface tension to work

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Authors
Marto, Paul J.
Subjects
Advisors
Date of Issue
1987
Date
Publisher
Office of Naval Research
Language
Abstract
Since 1765, when James Watt conceived the idea of using a separate surface condenser in a steam engine, the condenser has become an important component in steam power systems. Heat rejection in the condenser is vital to a steam power cycle, and condensers are designed to reject heat at the lowest possible vapor temperature (and therefore pressure) so that a high thermo-dynamic efficiency is achieved. In the last century, the surface condenser has evolved considerably as designers have understood more about the complex heat transfer processes which oc­cur when steam flows into a bundle of water-cooled tubes.
Type
Article
Description
Series/Report No
Department
Mechanical Engineering
Organization
Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Funder
Format
7 p.
Citation
P.J. Marto, "Steam condensation: putting surface tension to work," Naval Research Reviews, v.39, no.1 (1987), pp. 44-50.
Distribution Statement
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
Collections