Publication:
A business of security: applying an economic model to human trafficking in Oregon

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Authors
Vo, Thanh N.
Subjects
human trafficking
trafficking in persons
modern slavery
sex trafficking
labor trafficking
Oregon
supply and demand
cost-benefit analysis
Advisors
Halladay, Carolyn
Date of Issue
2016-12
Date
Dec-16
Publisher
Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
Human trafficking is the second-largest criminal industry in the world and has become the fastest-growing crime today, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Many policies have attempted to reduce human trafficking through under-resourced initiatives and social services. This thesis explores whether applying an economic supply and demand model to human trafficking at the state level would reduce the prevalence of human trafficking. Using an economic supply and demand model, the research evaluates current literature and existing national and state policies within Oregon, analyzing weaknesses and gaps. The thesis presents policy analysis under a qualitative cost-benefit lens to assess economic model variables applied to state level policies. The conclusion is that existing anti-human trafficking policies in Oregon are lacking in instilling risks and costs associated with conducting the criminal behavior. Supply and demand actors in human trafficking are operating relatively unhindered in Oregon, which has led to a growth of the problem in the state. Thus, a three-pronged approach built around an applied economic supply and demand model is recommended to help reduce human trafficking in Oregon: reduce costs to victims, increase costs to suppliers, and increase costs to buyers.
Type
Thesis
Description
Series/Report No
Department
National Security Affairs (NSA)
Organization
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NPS Report Number
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Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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