Publication:
The XM777 joint lightweight 155mm Howitzer program (LW155): case study in program management considerations concerning the use of national arsenal assets

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Authors
Clark, Philip R.
Subjects
XM777
Joint Lightweight 155mm Howitzer
LW155
Army Arsenal Act
Stratton Amendment
Watervliet Arsenal (WVA)
Rock Island Arsenal (RIA)
Advisors
Matthews, David F.
Franck, Raymond E.
Date of Issue
2003-09
Date
September 2003
Publisher
Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
The end of the Cold War signaled hard times ahead for both public and private manufacturers in the Nation's Defense Industry. Army-controlled manufacturing Arsenals, subject to Governmental control and requirements to maintain excess mobilization capacity, found themselves increasingly unable to compete with private industry on cost. Set-aside protectionist legislation, especially the Army Arsenal Act and the Stratton Amendments, played an increasing role in the ability of the Arsenals to obtain work. The Army Arsenal Act applies to "make or buy" decisions and the Stratton Amendment restricts the transfer of large-caliber cannon technology to foreign nations. The LW155 Joint Program Office has dealt with both statutes because it manages a multi-national weapon system with a large-caliber cannon and is scheduled for production by the Army. This report uses the LW155 Program as a case study to examine three areas of importance to a Program Manager: the application of the Army Arsenal Act to joint service programs; the prime contractor's ability to control the origin of component parts; and the constraints upon multi-national production caused by the Stratton Amendment.
Type
Description
MBA Professional Report
Department
Graduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP)
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Funder
Format
xiv, 91 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Citation
Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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