Publication:
A Marshall Plan for the 21st Century: Addressing Climate Change in the Asia-Pacific Through Diplomacy, Development, & Defense

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Authors
Rollins, Adam
Subjects
Marshall Plan, Climate Change, Asia-Pacific, Diplomacy, Development, Defense
Advisors
Wheeler, Monique
Frazier, Dr. Tim G.
Date of Issue
2019-05
Date
Publisher
Monterey California. Naval Postgraduate School
Language
en_US
Abstract
The inevitable climate challenges facing the Asia-Pacific territory require a massive whole-of-government approach comparable to the Marshall Plan of 1948. While many political leaders have called for such a plan, no policy currently exists for this region or purpose. With nearly eight trillion dollars in trade revenue passing through crucially strategic straits daily, seven of the ten largest militaries in the world (five of which are nuclear capable) operating throughout this territory, and a forecast for nearly exponential population growth, the geopolitical provenance of the United States ties inextricably to this portion of the globe. A document analysis assessing existing diplomatic, developmental, and defensive policies concludes that a modern-day Marshall Plan for the 21st century Asia-Pacific is achievable by realigning lines of effort within current frameworks. As long as the United States continues to deny climate change, other nation-state actors within the area will rise to fill the void. The United States must commit to the funding, development, and proliferation of clean and sustainable energy solutions which evolve past current fossil-fuel reliant technologies, and most importantly, be open-source in description and shared with other large polluters throughout the world. Finally, the nations of the Asian-Pacific realm should contemplate a theater-specific treaty organization. As climate change threatens to destabilize the region, a unified force intent on providing stabilization efforts, preventing internal conflict and escalation, and enforcing international law deserves consideration and deliberation.
Type
Thesis
Description
CIVINS (Civilian Institutions) Thesis document
Department
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
NPS CIVINS
Funder
Format
72 p.
Citation
Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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