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dc.contributor.advisorBiermann, Rafael
dc.contributor.advisorAbenheim, Donald
dc.contributor.authorReimers, Frank.
dc.dateJune 2007
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-22T15:31:38Z
dc.date.available2012-08-22T15:31:38Z
dc.date.issued2007-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/10224
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis uses a comparative case study approach to examine how security cultures change under the impact of political shocks and learning through failure. The thesis thus analyzes the security cultures of Germany and the United States as they evolve under the impact of the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina from 1992 to 1995. The thesis thereby also enhances our understanding of German and U.S. foreign policies. Using paired observations for controlled comparison, the thesis employs process tracing to examine the nature and quantity of change. The case studies demonstrate that security cultures influence the assessment of political situations, restrain policy objectives, and condition the range of issues to which political attention is devoted. Both cases reveal that security cultures affect the evaluation of policy options and the choices that are made. The thesis argues that different transformations of German and U.S. security cultures led to divergent political behavior particularly with regard to the use of force, resulting in more forceful and effective interventions in Bosnia and a reframing of future interventions in third-party conflicts. Domestic reactions to the Bosnian war transformed the security culture in Germany, whereas reactions in the U.S. triggered a re-ranking of cultural preferences. Understanding how security cultures change and evolve through exogenous and endogenous factors improves the chances of policy success in today's challenging international environment.en_US
dc.format.extentx, 131 p. ; 28 cm.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined
in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the
public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States
Code, Section 105, is not copyrighted in the U.S.en_US
dc.subject.lcshRefugees.en_US
dc.titleSecurity culture in times of war: how did the Balkan War affect the security cultures in Germany and the United States?en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.subject.authorGermanyen_US
dc.subject.authorUnited Statesen_US
dc.subject.authorsecurity cultureen_US
dc.subject.authorstrategic cultureen_US
dc.subject.authorcultural changeen_US
dc.subject.authorcultural preferencesen_US
dc.subject.authorBosnian waren_US
dc.subject.authorBalkan warsen_US
dc.subject.authorformative eventsen_US
dc.subject.authorpolitical shocksen_US
dc.subject.authorforeign policyen_US
dc.subject.authorcrisis managementen_US
dc.subject.authorcrisis interventionen_US
dc.subject.authoruse of forceen_US
dc.description.recognitionOutstanding Thesisen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A. in National Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNational Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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