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dc.contributor.advisorNissen, Mark
dc.contributor.advisorArquilla, John
dc.contributor.authorLeweling, Tara A.
dc.dateSeptember 2007
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-22T15:31:47Z
dc.date.available2012-08-22T15:31:47Z
dc.date.issued2007-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/10273
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractContemporary organizational theory posits that teams undertaking complex tasks outperform when lateral, peer-to-peer relationships are emphasized over vertical, subordinate-to-supervisor relationships. Outlining my argument within a structural contingency framework, I suggest that the intersection of the information processing structures and the contigent influence of knowledge sharing is an underexplored avenue for explaining variance in individual and team performance. I use a laboratory setting to explore this theoretical intersection. I manipulate the knowledge sharing processes and information processing structures of four multi-person teams as they undertake a series of computer-mediated counterterrorism decisionmaking exercises with high task complexity and reciprocal interdependency. I analyze the experimental results to explore the relationships between individual team performance and 1) differentiated information processing structures, 2) ability to share knowledge, and 3) interactions between these two manipulations. Each team repeats a variant of the same counterterrorism decisionmaking exercise four times and two of the four teams switch configurations halfway through the experimental series, allowing me to explore individual and team performance 1) cross-sectionally, 2) over time (i.e. learning) and 3) across structural reconfigurations. By way of contribution, this work extends structural contingency theory to work groups through the lenses of information processing and knowledge sharing in order to examine their putative effects on individual and team performance cross-sectionally, longitudinally, and when subjected to structural change.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/extendingorganiz1094510273
dc.format.extentxvi, 297 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.subject.lcshTerrorism Preventionen_US
dc.titleExtending organizational contingency theory to team performance: an information processing and knowledge flows perspectiveen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentInformation Sciences (IS)
dc.subject.authorStructural contingency theory; team performance; information processing theory; knowledge flows theoryen_US
dc.subject.authorcounterterrorismen_US
dc.subject.authorinformation processing networksen_US
etd.thesisdegree.namePh.D. in Information Sciencesen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelDoctoralen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineInformation Sciencesen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)en_US


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