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dc.contributor.advisorShattuck, Nita Lewis
dc.contributor.authorTvaryanas, Anthony P.
dc.dateSeptember 2010
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-22T15:32:48Z
dc.date.available2012-08-22T15:32:48Z
dc.date.issued2010-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/10571
dc.descriptionHuman Systems Integration Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation tackles, head on, two fundamental questions: What is human systems integration (HSI) and how should one think about HSI problems? The objective was to develop a coherent systems method to improve the integration of HSI domains to create sustainable systems while preserving system stakeholder preferences. This dissertation addresses these questions by accomplishing two things: 1) extracting the lessons learned from a historical analysis of the emergence of HSI both as a philosophy and as a Defense Department program, and 2) using those lessons to characterize and illustrate a technical approach to addressing HSI considerations early in an acquisition process. It is shown that the discourse on general systems that occurred over the latter half of the twentieth century, coupled with pressing organizational factors within the U.S. Army, were the principal forces that shaped and drove the emergence and formal recognition of HSI. As determined from this historical analysis, HSI involves the integration of the behavioral sciences, human factors engineering, and operations research to more broadly represent human considerations in early weapon system analyses and the products that evolve from these analyses. Inclusion of HSI in system analyses necessitates a holistic perspective of the performance and economic trade space formed by the synthesis of the HSI domains. As a result, individual domain interventions are considered in terms of tradeoff decisions. Ideally, the HSI trade space can be systematically explored by integrating Simon's research strategy, Kennedy and Jones' isoperformance approach, and coupling isoperformance with utility analysis through means such as physical programming. Although domain tradeoffs are a central element of HSI, very few studies illustrate the integration of the behavioral sciences and human factors engineering with the tools and methodologies of operations research. Accordingly, three case studies are presented: a preexisting opportunistic dataset of potential Air Force unmanned aircraft pilots, a prospective dataset of Army Soldiers in Basic Combat Training, and data derived from simulation of staffing and shift scheduling solutions using a biomathematical model. Lastly, guidelines for a New HSI method and future challenges are discussed.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/adiscourseinhums1094510571
dc.format.extentxxxii, 608 : ill. (chiefly col.), 1 col. map 28 cm.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.subject.lcshPsychologyen_US
dc.titleA discourse in human systems integrationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentComputer Science
dc.contributor.departmentModeling, Virtual Environments and Simulation (MOVES)
dc.contributor.departmentOperations Research (OR)
dc.subject.authorAcquisitionen_US
dc.subject.authorFatigue (Physiology)en_US
dc.subject.authorHuman Factors Engineeringen_US
dc.subject.authorHuman Systems Integrationen_US
dc.subject.authorHumanitiesen_US
dc.subject.authorIsoperformanceen_US
dc.subject.authorManpoweren_US
dc.subject.authorOperations Researchen_US
dc.subject.authorPerformance (Human)en_US
dc.subject.authorSafetyen_US
dc.subject.authorSelectionen_US
dc.subject.authorSocial Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.authorSystems Engineeringen_US
dc.subject.authorTrainingen_US
etd.thesisdegree.namePh.D in Modeling, Virtual Environments and Simulation (MOVES)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelDoctoralen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineModeling, Virtual Environments and Simulation (MOVES)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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