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dc.contributor.advisorSimons, Anna
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Daniel W.
dc.contributor.authorOlson, Melanie L.
dc.dateDecember 2011
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-22T15:32:58Z
dc.date.available2012-08-22T15:32:58Z
dc.date.issued2011-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/10617
dc.description.abstractAn assumption underpinning Western liberal democracy is that separation of religion and state always improves stability, and U.S. policy often encourages nations to move toward secular government structures. Yet, ethnically plural societies may need a common identity for the nation to gel and religion might be the glue that can hold a society together. Recent nation-building efforts signal a need for greater understanding of how best to employ religion as a cross-cutting tie for social cohesion. This thesis examines Israel, Iran, and Turkey; each has varying ethnic and religious compositions and has attempted to use religion for domestic stability. While Israel and Iran validate religion's cohesive power, all cases highlight the possible adverse effects of this approach. The findings of this thesis identify which political systems, religious contexts, population demographics, and/or political circumstances are most conducive for leveraging religion to aid domestic stability. We conclude that, while in many cases religion may increase volatility, in some circumstances religious glue may, actually, effectively bridge ethnic divisions to promote cohesion and stability. The most conducive conditions for this approach are when political systems protect minority rights and allow religion in the public sphere, but restrict the government from mandating religious practices.en_US
dc.format.extentxiv, 77 p. ; 28 cm.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.subject.lcshStability.en_US
dc.titleThe sticky subject of religion: can it ever be the glue for a stable society?en_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderRobinson, Glenn E.
dc.contributor.departmentDefense Analysis
dc.subject.authorReligionen_US
dc.subject.authorreligious identityen_US
dc.subject.authorseparation of church and stateen_US
dc.subject.authorreligion-state differentiationen_US
dc.subject.authordomestic stabilityen_US
dc.subject.authorsocial cohesionen_US
dc.subject.authorethnic conflicten_US
dc.subject.authorminority rightsen_US
dc.subject.authorminority issuesen_US
dc.subject.authorIsraelen_US
dc.subject.authorIranen_US
dc.subject.authorTurkeyen_US
dc.subject.authorZionismen_US
dc.subject.authorIslamic Republicen_US
dc.subject.authortheocracyen_US
dc.subject.authorTurkish-Islamic Synthesisen_US
dc.subject.authorIslamismen_US
dc.subject.authorJudaismen_US
dc.description.serviceUS Air Force (USAF) authorsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Defense Analysisen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineDefense Analysisen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)en_US


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