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dc.contributor.advisorRasmussen, Maria
dc.contributor.authorReeves, Jeremy R.
dc.dateDecember 2011
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-22T15:33:12Z
dc.date.available2012-08-22T15:33:12Z
dc.date.issued2011-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/10680
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractState sponsorship of terrorism, though not as prevalent as in previous decades, is still a complex phenomenon our government has yet to adequately address, despite the threat it continues to pose to our national security. Current U.S. policy toward state sponsors of terrorism is constrained by a number of laws, which mandate a host of economic and diplomatic sanctions be put in place when a state is designated as a sponsor of terrorism. As such, policymakers must careful consider all of the complex ramifications before labeling an offending state for fear of alienating necessary allies and harming the international economy. This paper argues a more effective response to state-sponsored terrorism can be found through a deeper understanding of the phenomenon. To this end, a new typology for state-sponsored terrorism is presented, offering policymakers a nuanced approach to dealing with offending states. The primary benefit of such an approach is the inherent flexibility to tailor U.S. response to the precise relationship between the terrorist organization and its state sponsor. States currently on the State Department's list of state sponsors of terrorism and states that should be are examined, detailing the shortcomings of current U.S. policy and the advantages of the proposed typology.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/anewtypologyfors1094510680
dc.format.extentxiv, 87 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.subject.lcshState-sponsored terrorism.en_US
dc.titleA new typology for state-sponsored international terrorismen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderDahl, Erik
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.subject.authorstate-sponsored terrorismen_US
dc.subject.authorIranen_US
dc.subject.authorHizballahen_US
dc.subject.authorSyriaen_US
dc.subject.authorHAMASen_US
dc.subject.authorLibyaen_US
dc.subject.authorPalestinian Islamic Jihaden_US
dc.subject.authorPIJen_US
dc.subject.authorSudanen_US
dc.subject.authorAbu Nidal Organizationen_US
dc.subject.authorANOen_US
dc.subject.authorPakistanen_US
dc.subject.authorSaudi Arabiaen_US
dc.subject.authorCubaen_US
dc.subject.authorVenezuelaen_US
dc.subject.authorU.S. State Departmenten_US
dc.subject.authorNORAIDen_US
dc.subject.authorProvisional Irish Republican Armyen_US
dc.subject.authorPIRAen_US
dc.subject.authoral Qaeda;en_US
dc.description.recognitionOutstanding Thesisen_US
dc.description.serviceUS Air Force (USAF) authoren_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A. in Security Studies (Homeland Security and Defenseen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Homeland Security and Defenseen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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