Publication:
A quantitative model for assessing visual simulation software architecture

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Authors
Harder, Robert W.
Subjects
software metrics
visual simulation
architecture
frameworks
openness
reuse
reusability
agility
components
Advisors
Darken, Rudy
Date of Issue
2011-09
Date
September 2011
Publisher
Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
The U.S. military is the largest single user of simulation in the world, and our visual simulations can be software intensive systems with a lifespan of many years. Managers of these simulations need tools to help them make better decisions at the architectural level. Currently, no such quantitative models with supporting metrics exist for this purpose. There are properties that are held as positive characteristics in visual simulation architectures. Visual simulation architectures can be distinguished from one another based on three characteristics: (1) openness, as defined by the use of standards, licensing, and support of innovation; (2) reuse, as defined by the potential of being used in subsequent projects; and (3) agility, as defined by the ease with which software can be integrated, reconfigured, or repurposed. In this research, we propose quantifiable models to measure openness, reuse, and agility, and claim that the models adequately distinguish visual simulation frameworks from one another. Furthermore, we claim that these models can enhance military acquisition decisions. The results show that application of the metrics offers a level of granularity that is useful in identifying key differences in simulation frameworks that could have profound downstream implications.
Type
Thesis
Description
Series/Report No
Department
Computer Science
Other Units
Naval Postgraduate School
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Funder
Format
xviii, 123 p. : col. ill.
28 cm.
Citation
Distribution Statement
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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