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dc.contributor.advisorMiller, John B.
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Christofer M.
dc.dateSeptember 2001
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-22T15:34:13Z
dc.date.available2012-08-22T15:34:13Z
dc.date.issued2001-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/10907
dc.descriptionThis thesis document was issues under the authority of another institution, not NPS. At the time it was written, a copy was added to the NPS Library Collection for reasons not now known. It has been included in the digital archive for its historical value to NPS. Not believed to be a CIVINS (Civilian Institutions) title.en_US
dc.description.abstractSupporting the ships and submarines berthed at United States Navy installations is a core capability and essential to mission-readiness. Over the previous ten years, Congressional discretionary spending, which keeps these facilities in operational condition, has been reduced to minimal sustainment levels, thus inhibiting the shore installation commander's ability to effectively manage their regions and support both United States and foreign fleets. Changes in Congressional membership, coupled with a change in Presidential administrations, has produced verbal commitments to fortify our military infrastructure in the hope of arresting, and even reversing, years of infrastructure deterioration. Navy waterfront infrastructure is procured via contracting officers governed by the Federal Acquisition Regulations and subordinate instructions. This thesis proposes a Three-Tiered Framework to procurement packaging. Specific drivers are applied to eliminate unavailable contract delivery options. Private construction industry strategies are then applied to determine delivery method attractiveness. The combination of both is present as a framework for packaging Navy waterfront projects that are attractive to the private sector. Through analysis of the worldwide data and discussions with OSD, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) staff, and interviews with over 40 senior naval personnel and industry leaders; four representative bases were modeled against the Tree-Tiered Framework. The installations selected are Naval Station Norfolk Virginia; Commander Fleet Activities Yokosuka Japan; Naval Base Ventura County California; and Navy Station Roosevelt Roads Puerto Rico. The bases include large, small, international, and a second base in the continental United States. All facilities are located in areas under direct United States Government control, with no Status of Forces Agreements or international charters that limit waterfront procurements.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/threetieredprocu1094510907
dc.format.extent143 leaves ; 28 cm.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleThree-tiered procurement framework for U.S. Navy waterfront facilitiesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateMassachusetts Institute of Technology
dc.contributor.departmentCivil and Environmental Engineering
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Commander, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineCivil and Environmental Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dcterms.publisherCambridge, Massachusetts; Massachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US


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