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dc.contributor.authorGoggins, David A.
dc.dateSept 2001
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-22T15:34:17Z
dc.date.available2012-08-22T15:34:17Z
dc.date.issued2001-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/10921
dc.descriptionCIVINS (Civilian Institutions) Thesis documenten_US
dc.description.abstractIt is estimated that 70 to 85 percent of a naval ship's life-cycle cost is determined during the concept exploration phase which places an importance in the methodology used by the designer to select the concept design. But trade-off studies are guided primarily by past experience, rules-of-thumb, and designer preference. This approach is ad hoc, not efficient and may not lead to an optimum concept design. Even worse, once the designer has a 'good' concept design, he has no process or methodology to determine whether a better concept design is possible or not. A methodology is required to search the design space for an optimal solution based on the specified preferences from the customer. But the difficulty is the design space, which is non-linear, discontinuous, and bounded by a variety of constraints, goals, and thresholds. Then the design process itself is difficult to optimize because of the coupling among decomposed engineering disciplines and sub-system interactions. These attributes prevent application of mature optimization techniques including Lagrange multipliers, steepest ascent methods, linear programming, non-linear programming, and dynamic programming. To further improve submarine concept exploration, this thesis examines a statistical technique called Response Surface Methods (RSM). The purpose of RSM is to lead to an understanding of the relationship between the input (factors) and Output (response) variables, often to further the optimization of the underlying process. The RSM approach allows the designers to find a local optimal and examine how the design factors affect the response in the region around the generated optimal point.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/responsesurfacem1094510921
dc.format.extentix, 100 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleResponse surface methods applied to submarine concept explorationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateMassachusetts Institute of Technology
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical Engineering
dc.description.funderCIVINSen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Mechanical Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineMechanical Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US


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