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dc.contributor.advisorMcCormick, Gordon
dc.contributor.advisorMansager, Bard
dc.contributor.authorPecha, Keith E.
dc.contributor.authorCharlebois, Michael A.
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:30:48Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:30:48Z
dc.date.issued2004-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/1174
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this thesis is to determine which of three competing theories of what occurred at the Battle of Little Bighorn is the most plausible by utilizing the Joint Conflict and Tactical Simulation (JCATS) program developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. There are many practical gains that JCATS can provide today's military with regard to training and educating soldiers for future conflicts. JCATS can be used to train soldiers in planning and executing missions in ways not feasible with conventional field training exercises utilizing live bodies and real vehicles. It is also increasingly being used for actual mission planning. However, very little has been done using JCATS to war-game past operations. There are two points to be gained by using JCATS to model a historical battle such as the Battle of Little Bighorn. First, it validates the ability of JCATS to accurately model actual historical scenarios while identifying many of the specific limitations of the program. If the military is going to use computer simulations such as JCATS in lieu of field training exercises to train soldiers, it must first be determined if the program produces realistic results. Modeling an actual battle and comparing the results of the program with what actually occurred is one means of doing so. Second, modeling historical battles, particularly defeats, may assist in discovering lessons learned. In a field training exercise, a defeated force can be brought back to life and given another opportunity to apply the lessons learned from its previous defeat. Real battles afford no such opportunity. Computer modeling of past battles would allow military planners to isolate individual events and decisions and study their impact on the outcome.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/historicalnalysi109451174
dc.format.extentxiv, 121 p. ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshComputer simulationen_US
dc.subject.lcshMilitary planningen_US
dc.subject.lcshComputer programsen_US
dc.subject.lcshIndians of North Americaen_US
dc.titleHistorical analysis of the Battle of Little Bighorn utilizing the Joint Conflict and Tactical Simulation (JCATS)en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.).
dc.contributor.departmentDefense Analysis (DA)
dc.description.serviceMajor, United States Armyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Defense Analysis (Special Operations/Low Intensity Conflict)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineDefense Analysisen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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