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dc.contributor.advisorMcNelley, Terry R.
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Robert A.
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:30:54Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:30:54Z
dc.date.issued2004-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/1207
dc.description.abstractFriction Stir Processing (FSP) is novel technique for localized modification of the surface layer of materials. FSP produces high local strains, strain rates and local temperatures that are 0.8 - 0.9 Tm, where Tm is the melting point. The processing enhances the microstructural and mechanical properties of materials through intense plastic deformation. This thesis examines the microstructure and tensile properties in FSPed Nickel Aluminum Propeller Bronze (NAB) as a function of position in the stir zone using a unique miniature tensile sample design. Test materials were single and multi-pass FSP runs from both 6 mm and 13 mm tools. Tensile ductility was observed to increase from 11 percent to more than 30 percent elongation to fracture at locations along the center of the stir zone. Yield and ultimate strengths also increased two-fold. These improved properties were associated with the formation of WidmanstaÌ tten [a] and fine, equiaxed [a] at peak temperatures of approximately 1000 [degrees] C in these locations. Some locations in the heat affected zone (HAZ) or thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ) exhibited ductilities below that of as-cast material. Such regions had microstructures that contained a dark-etching constituent formed by cooling after being heated to approximately 800 [degrees] C.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/amicrostructural109451207
dc.format.extentxiv, 55 p. : col. ill. ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.subject.lcshNickel-aluminum alloysen_US
dc.subject.lcshMetalsen_US
dc.subject.lcshMicrostructureen_US
dc.subject.lcshMechanical propertiesen_US
dc.titleA microstructural and mechanical property correlation of friction stir processed nickel aluminum bronzeen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.description.serviceUS Navy (USN) author.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc60830151
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S.en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineMechanical Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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