Publication:
A historical and critical review of the factors affecting the development of United States ports and their relationship to public policy.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Authors
Fritzke, Herman E. Jr.
Subjects
Advisors
Horton, O.G.
Date of Issue
1965
Date
1965
Publisher
Monterey, California: U.S. Naval Postgraduate School
Language
en_US
Abstract
The development of the seaports of the United States has been a variegated undertaking, the result of local self interest. Both over development and under development exist due to competitive pressures between ports. Divergence in government, management, planning and service are evidenced by the various port authorities. This paper seeks to identify the factors which have led to the development of ports: area, economic growth, and private and governmental bodies. The general public and the nation have expended huge sums of money in the name of port development, which now runs into billions annually. Often little is done to ensure effective planning and investment in the interest of national objectives and public policy. Conflicts of authority and jurisdiction, coupled with questionable financial assistance practices are magnified in light of current requirements for expansion of port facilities. Suggestions are made relative to improvement of organization, control, and government assistance programs by examining the control which port authorities have and how it suits the requirements for development.
Type
Thesis
Description
Series/Report No
Department
Business Administration and Economics
Organization
Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Funder
Format
Citation
Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
Collections