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dc.contributor.advisorTrinkunas, Harold
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, Brian R.
dc.dateDecember 2004
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:31:01Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:31:01Z
dc.date.issued2004-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/1239
dc.descriptionApproved for public release, distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractWith the absence of a bipolar international system and the rise of globalization, there are two tracks of foreign diplomatic and economic policy that nation-states can pursue. These can be competing or complementary. The first is global integration. The other course is to concentrate on regional integration. The European Union is the best example of this today. Latin America also faces a choice in its future. MERCOSUR, the "Common Market of the South" is an economic initiative that offers promise of economic development. Begun in 1991 as an economic agreement between four nations in the Southern Cone, MERCOSUR made large gains in regional trade during its initial years. As the global economy began lagging at the turn of the century, proponents for MERCOSUR have had a more difficult time arguing its benefits. Should MERCOSUR survive this test, it could emerge stronger and continue to expand along the same lines politically and militarily as the European Union. This thesis will open by examining the evolution of MERCOSUR compared to the model of the European Union. The next chapter will focus on the problems the Common Market has faced since its inception and how the actors have dealt with them. It will offer the corrective steps necessary for the project to succeed. The final chapter will focus on economic nationalism. What is it and will it derail Mercosur? The answer may be startling to some. The conclusion will summarize the arguments made and make a prediction on the future of MERCOSUR, the "Common Market of the South."en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/thefutureofmerco109451239
dc.format.extentx, 47 p.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleThe future of MERCOSURen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderLooney, Robert
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.).
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of National Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorMERCOSURen_US
dc.subject.authorBrazilen_US
dc.subject.authorArgentinaen_US
dc.subject.authorRegional integrationen_US
dc.subject.authorSouth Americaen_US
dc.subject.authorEconomicsen_US
dc.subject.authorLiberal market reformen_US
dc.description.serviceMajor, United States Marine Corpsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A. in National Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNational Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US


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